Repentance

Discussion in 'Theology and Doctrine' started by Anglican04, Mar 8, 2018.

  1. Anglican04

    Anglican04 Active Member Anglican

    Posts:
    163
    Likes Received:
    112
    Hello guys. The purpose of this thread is to discuss repentance as a whole, especially how each one of us repent. A lot of us have great spiritual practices and we have a lot to lean from each other.

    So when I repent, I usually spend a few seconds recalling my sinfulness. After, I begin praying in a personal dialogue with God. This lasts about 5 minutes, then I move on to the Act of Contrition, a prayer most of the Romans use, but I have made it a habit to recite it often, when I pray in the morning and night due to the fact it has little words but big meaning.

    Here is the prayer: O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended Thee, and I detest all my sins because of Thy just punishments, but most of all because they offend Thee, my God, Who art all-good and deserving of all my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of Thy grace, to sin no more and to avoid the near occasions of sin.

    Then I meditate some on Christ's passion. Afterwards, I usually ask for grace and for help to use the grace which God has given me already, so that I may be less likely to sin.

    Feel free to leave your "method" of repentance below :)
     
  2. TemplarKnight40

    TemplarKnight40 New Member

    Posts:
    17
    Likes Received:
    13
    Country:
    Canada
    Religion:
    Anglican
    I like to use the Book of Common Prayer formulas for my personal prayer and reflection. I love the archaic English. There are a few Roman Catholic I flip in once in awhile, I prefer the Anglican nowadays.
     
    peter and Anglican04 like this.
  3. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    953
    Likes Received:
    566
    Country:
    N Ireland
    Religion:
    Traditional RomanCatholic
    Prior to auricular confession I call to mind my sins, sins against God, my neighbour and myself, acts of omission and commission, and I ask God to help me make a good confession. Then I confess my sins to my spiritual advisor and truthfully provide any clarification he might ask for and listen to any advice he will give on avoiding sin. The priest will then impose an appropriate penance. I express regret for my sins and ask the priest for absolution and then recite my Act Of Contrition. The priest using authority granted him will grant me absolution and will conclude by saying "go in peace your sins are forgiven". I never fail to sense a feeling of great relief and rebirth when I meditate after confession and I rejoice when receiving the Blessed Sacrament for I know that at that moment in time my soul is pure having made a good confession. This post is in no way intended to promote my faith but is my response to OP
     
    Anglican04 likes this.
  4. Lowly Layman

    Lowly Layman Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    2,009
    Likes Received:
    1,815
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    American Anglican
    This is my lenten practice.

    A penitential office:

    http://commonprayer.org/offices/penit_n.cfm

    But I don't think a liturgy is absolutely necessary...just a contrite heart turned to God in prayer cleaving to the forgiveness offered in Christ.
     
    TemplarKnight40 and Anglican04 like this.
  5. Anglican04

    Anglican04 Active Member Anglican

    Posts:
    163
    Likes Received:
    112
    Thanks for sharing that @Lowly Layman . I will start reciting that as well.
     
  6. American Anglican

    American Anglican New Member Anglican

    Posts:
    9
    Likes Received:
    7
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Anglican
    How often do you guys repent? Both throughout the year and in Lent? I usually do it a couple of times a week, but in Lent I've been doing it every night.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2018
    Anglican04 likes this.
  7. Anglican04

    Anglican04 Active Member Anglican

    Posts:
    163
    Likes Received:
    112
    Every night and day. Try using this thing called ACTS, a good Christian ACTS like one.

    A- Adoration, adore God
    C- Contrition, repent
    T-Thank God
    S- Supplications

    This should add structure and make your prayer well rounded.
     
    TemplarKnight40 likes this.
  8. TemplarKnight40

    TemplarKnight40 New Member

    Posts:
    17
    Likes Received:
    13
    Country:
    Canada
    Religion:
    Anglican

    I really like that penitential Office Lowly Layman. I think I'll use it now!
     
    Lowly Layman likes this.
  9. TemplarKnight40

    TemplarKnight40 New Member

    Posts:
    17
    Likes Received:
    13
    Country:
    Canada
    Religion:
    Anglican
    I go to Church @ lunch time for Holy Eucharist. If I can't go over a 2 day period. I perform repentance prayers.
     
    Anglican04 and American Anglican like this.
  10. AnglicanTex

    AnglicanTex Member Anglican

    Posts:
    34
    Likes Received:
    26
    Country:
    United States of America
    Religion:
    Christianity
    I read the litany today during MP.
     
    Lowly Layman and Anglican04 like this.
  11. peter

    peter Active Member

    Posts:
    95
    Likes Received:
    140
    Country:
    England
    Religion:
    Anglican
    I generally use the BCP (1662) Morning/Evening Prayer formula (we have erred and strayed from thy ways like lost sheep...). Sometimes the Communion service formula (we acknowledge and bewail our manifold sins and wickedness...). I also recite the 10 Commandments as a sort of examination of conscience (again following Cranmer's pattern and wording). Also the Litany from time to time and occasionally the Commination.
     
    Stalwart and Anglican04 like this.
  12. JoeLaughon

    JoeLaughon Active Member Anglican

    Posts:
    127
    Likes Received:
    82
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Reformed High Anglican
    The BCP Morning/Evening Prayer's confession is to me one of the greatest ever written. It starts with God as both mighty and merciful, goes on in detail to our own particular sins and general sinfulness. Then comes the gutpunch with "And there is no health in us." But then it switches But Thou, O Lord. The focus is no longer on our own sinfulness but now instead God's work of mercy. This combined with the sentences of repentance, the Anglican rosary with its heavy emphasis on the Jesus Prayer and the Litany of Mercy in the St Augustine Prayerbook are especially helpful. The penitential Psalms as well.
     
    Anglican04 and Lowly Layman like this.

Share This Page