Justification by faith alone

Discussion in 'Questions about Anglicanism' started by Aidan, Nov 30, 2017.

  1. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    Do Anglicans, and you as an individual , propose or oppose this belief?
     
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  2. Cameron

    Cameron New Member

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    Most Anglicans I know oppose this. Henry hated Luther anyway.
     
  3. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Of course! It is a historic belief taught by all times and all places, except medieval Rome, and even they are now coming to accept it... St. Paul knew what's what, and the Church is a faithful follower of St. Paul
     
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  4. DivineOfficeNerd

    DivineOfficeNerd Member Anglican

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    The adage by S. James that "faith without works is dead" remains true even for sola fidei. Faith that does not give forth works is truly no faith at all, just as works by themselves do not constitute salvation.
     
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  5. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Yep... the two halves of the amazing whole which is called salvation
     
  6. anawkwardaardvark

    anawkwardaardvark Member Typist Anglican

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    In short, yes:

    XI. Of the Justification of Man.
    We are accounted righteous before God, only for the merit of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ by Faith, and not for our own works or deservings. Wherefore, that we are justified by Faith only, is a most wholesome Doctrine, and very full of comfort, as more largely is expressed in the Homily of Justification.

    XII. Of Good Works.
    Albeit that Good Works, which are the fruits of Faith, and follow after Justification, cannot put away our sins, and endure the severity of God's judgment; yet are they pleasing and acceptable to God in Christ, and do spring out necessarily of a true and lively Faith insomuch that by them a lively Faith may be as evidently known as a tree discerned by the fruit.

    XIII. Of Works before Justification.
    Works done before the grace of Christ, and the Inspiration of his Spirit, are not pleasant to God, forasmuch as they spring not of faith in Jesus Christ; neither do they make men meet to receive grace, or (as the School-authors say) deserve grace of congruity: yea rather, for that they are not done as God hath willed and commanded them to be done, we doubt not but they have the nature of sin.

    HOMILY ON THE SALVATION OF MANKIND - Second Part

    "Nevertheless, this sentence, that we be justified by faith only, is not so meant of them, that the said justifying faith is alone in man, without true repentance, hope, charity, dread, and the fear of God, at any time and season. Nor when they say, That we be justified freely, they mean not that we should or might afterward be idle, and that nothing should be required on our parts afterward: Neither they mean not so to be justified with out good works, that we should do no good works at all, like as shall be more expressed at large hereafter. But this saying, That we be justified by faith only, freely and without works, is spoken for to take away clearly all merit of our works, as being unable to deserve our justification at God’s hands, and thereby most plainly to express the weakness of man, and the goodness of God, the great infirmity of ourselves, and the might and power of God, the imperfectness of our own works, and the most abundant grace of our Saviour Christ, and therefore wholly to ascribe the merit and deserving of our justification unto Christ only, and his most precious blood shedding."
     
  7. Tuxedo America

    Tuxedo America Member

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    There is certainly justification that occurs once you believe, but doesn't Scripture tell us that justification is a process, not a one time event?
     
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  8. DivineOfficeNerd

    DivineOfficeNerd Member Anglican

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    From what I understand, the process would come in what many Methodists call sanctification or what the Eastern Church calls theosis. Justification occurs at baptism.
     
  9. Peteprint

    Peteprint Well-Known Member Anglican

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    That is my understanding as well; Justification, followed by Sanctification (an on-going process).
     
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  10. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    O
    It would appear that on this forum Anglicans do propose this belief
     
  11. DivineOfficeNerd

    DivineOfficeNerd Member Anglican

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    You have to remember, we don't represent the vast majority of self proclaimed Anglicans throughout the world. Broad or low church theology combined with Roman ritual and vestments is the order of the hour, not us old fogeys. :)
     
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  12. neminem

    neminem Member

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    Luke 8:48 Then he said to her, "Daughter, your faith has healed you. Go in peace."
     
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  13. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

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    That's why I am so heartened about the new emergence of Gafcon, it's 2008 Declaration of Principles is deeply orthodox and binds its members in a doctrinal manner

    https://www.gafcon.org/resources/the-jerusalem-declaration

    ... number four says, ""We uphold the Thirty-nine Articles as containing the true doctrine of the Church agreeing with God’s Word and as authoritative for Anglicans today"

    And the Articles contain statements on justification... The future is looking bright!
     
  14. PotterMcKinney

    PotterMcKinney Active Member Typist Anglican

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    Anglicans that know what it means believe in Justification by Faith alone. It is one of the most important articles of the Christian faith, as I see it.
     
  15. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    So, what about the epistle of James then?
     
  16. Philip Barrington

    Philip Barrington Well-Known Member

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    The Epistle of James in no way dismisses the notion of Justification by Faith, but simply suggest that good works spring from faith. The First Book of Homilies, Homily 3, 4 and 5 I think expand on this point very clearly. The only person I know who ever contemplated omitting James from the Canon was Luther, and even he recanted of that position, quite probably to advance his proposed 'translation' by faith alone. Faith never ultimately really stand alone, for it is accompanied by will and intellect, and if there be time good works proceeding. Ultimately it is faith, trusting God, and accepting his love for us that sets the prisoner free.
     
  17. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Ultimately it has to be remembered that justification does not itself equal to salvation... along with justification must come sanctification, the two parts which inexorably depend on one another

    This was the kind of reasoning that the Church of Rome has seen in the 1999 concordat, accepting that it was wrong on the doctrine of justification at Trent
     
  18. neminem

    neminem Member

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    Justification by faith alone.
    The last two words 'faith alone' is the key.
    Faith alone is unconditional and unreserved. It is doubtless and fearless. It is as pure as Truth and Love is.
    Without faith alone one is reserved and doubtful, which hinders any Truth, even for salvation.
     
  19. Tuxedo America

    Tuxedo America Member

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    Are you talking about the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification? Where is this "admission"?
     
  20. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Yeah
     

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