Altar Rails?

Discussion in 'Church and Parish Life' started by Tuxedo America, Oct 5, 2017.

  1. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    I can speak a bit on this, as I know CANA well because they hold their national synods on the East Coast and not too far from me, so I'm frequently there. I can say that when the national CANA gets together the divine service is nothing if not exceptionally reverent, and kneeling at Holy Communion is mandated. Both Bishop Julian Dobbs (CANA East) and Felix Orji (CANA West) firmly espouse traditional Anglicanism with kneeling as a part of it.

    You may have had a misfortune to be near some new congregation where Bishop Orji has not yet instilled the proper Church Discipline, but with a church name like "Three Streams" Anglican you should've known better than to ever set a foot there. Caveat emptor!
     
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  2. Shane R

    Shane R Active Member

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    I'm not a cradle Anglican. I didn't know what 'three streams' was all about until I ran across that bunch. And the lot fell to them because the local ACC parish was such an unreliable joke (ie. seven old people who had a Mass sometimes, when a few could make it out). Oh, and the rector of Three Streams Anglican is Bp. Felix's Canon Missioner. That still doesn't answer for C4SO or even some of the locals to Coastal Virginia.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2017
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  3. Magistos

    Magistos New Member Anglican

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    I attend an ACNA church in Atlanta, and we also stand. We are renting space from a Christian school, we set up and take down every week, the room serves as a gathering space during the week and has a concrete floor (which we break up with rugs we lay out each week) and there is no possible provision for kneeling.

    As an aside, I've visited several in Atlanta, and they all stand. Again, temporary spaces - one is even a very successful coffee house the other days of the week (independent, and the coffee store owner is also the ordained priest for the church, so the coffee store is basically the church). Some are C4SO, some are ADOTS. Since it's Atlanta, I know that Archbishop Foley has his church is Loganville, which I'd like to visit, but that's a good hour and a half drive, both ways, and I know they have a permanent building, but I've no idea what they do for Communion.
     
  4. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    My experience as an Anglican growing up was that altar rails were the norm. Since then I have experience Anglican Churches with and without them. From a design perspective the absence of altar rails does reduce the separation between the congregation and the sanctuary. On the other hand taking communion whilst kneeling does provide a mini quiet time at the altar as against standing in another queue. Reverence and awe, transcendence and immanence, are the issues, it is our encounter with God which is central. Standing or kneeling is perhaps not so much the key issue so much as decently and in order. I know we all have experience, tradition, and preferences, however I see this as a matter of local practice.

    I feel that Article 34 is most relevant to this issue. http://forums.anglican.net/threads/article-34.1941/

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    I appreciate the non-cradle Anglicanism point. Neither am I...

    There is no question that there is a ton of work to do in the new ACNA in terms of catechesis. Bp. Julian's Canon Missioner is also not the most liturgical of men; I would imagine their policy with appointing canon missioners is people who are the most energetic in church-planting, not the ones with the deepest understanding of the reverence and liturgy.

    Anglican mission over the last 20-30 years seems to have happened (and is happening) by degrees: first we get you with the energetic low-church zealot, then you settle in, then you graduate into mature Anglicanism where we explain how the rules an the liturgy and the rubrics work. I make no comment on this paradigm, as it can have both upsides and downsides.

    However at least I can say that we have missioners; a lot of them. Many of those who criticize this approach sit from the protection of a walled garden which is going extinct.

    Anglican mission territories around the world are growing, rapidly, and the plan of 1000 church-plants that Archbishop Duncan announced has resulted in an existing, actual, plants of over 500 churches in that last 6-7 years all across the United States territory. This is an insane amount of new churches and (to me at least) immensely hopeful. I choose to view it as an opportunity, where the rest of us with a stable understanding of the liturgy should now reach out to the powers that be, and start to involve ourselves within the missionary programs, to make sure they "end" on traditional reverential Anglican doctrine, piety, and practice.

    Some can view it as a scandal that this isn't imported from day 1, but again, such people and churches are about to go extinct in the next 10-20 years. If this is the way we have to do things from now on, then okay. I am not scandalized, so long as we (the community here, and others) follow upon the Missionaries' foot steps, and insist on involving ourselves with the Catechetical training of the new plant, so that its roots and DNA are firmly planted on Anglican soil.
     
  6. TemplarKnight40

    TemplarKnight40 New Member

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    I go to Noon time Holy Eucharist services at a Anglican Cathedral. They have Altar rails to receive Holy Communion. I find it sacred and reverent when I receive the Eucharist. I was a once a Roman Catholic, and I never experience this in any Catholic church.
     

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