Why did the Anglic church reform

Discussion in 'Church History' started by Dallas Rivera, Oct 25, 2017.

  1. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    Congratulations on what is probably one of the best defenses of the doctrine I have yet seen.

    Anglicans are like to respond with something like:

    XXII. OF PURGATORY
    The Romish Doctrine concerning Purgatory, Pardons, Worshipping, and Adoration, as well of Images as of Reliques, and also invocation of Saints, is a fond thing vainly invented, and grounded upon no warranty of Scripture, but rather repugnant to the Word of God.​

    The medieval church had a baroque fascination with death, torture, and all manner of tales which in package were understood to comprise the Romish Doctrine that the articles reject. Some time back a thread was posted on the article and in that thread you will find the text from the Council of Trent defining a doctrine that is a contemporaneous Roman Catholic expression and therefore a closer expressed of what is rejected in the Articles. You can find that thread here: http://forums.anglican.net/threads/article-22.1824/

    Anglicans believe that in Christ rising, death is conquered. We do believe that God's love transcends the grave. Anglicans believe that beyond the grave there will be change in us for the better.

    1 John 3:2
    Beloved, we are God’s children now; what we will be has not yet been revealed.
    What we do know is this: when he is revealed, we will be like him, for we will see him as he is.​

    Is there a waiting period? On this point we may be a little conflicted as there is some material that would suggest that there is a day of general resurrection, which would imply a period of waiting twixt here and there, on the other hand there is some suggestion that we might be pretty quickly with the Lord.

    John Donne penned in his famous poem
    Death be not Proud
    One short sleep past, we wake eternally
    And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.

    The big issue with the Doctrine of Purgatory is the notion that we may put off the urgency of the gospel, the need for us to respond in this life to the love of God.

    2 Corinthians 6:2

    For he says, ‘At an acceptable time I have listened to you, and on a day of salvation I have helped you.’
    See, now is the acceptable time; see, now is the day of salvation!

    John 8:24
    I told you that you would die in your sins, for you will die in your sins unless you believe that I am he.’
    The essence of our salvation is bound in our relation with Jesus Christ, crucified and risen. What happens after death before we are assembled before the throne of God in Glory is, and I say it with an orthodox shrug, ineffable.

    Yet we all look forward to that day with one voice we all declare

    Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord
     
  2. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    Dear Ide, it was never my intention to be anti Anglican and I'm truly sorry that you find me so
     
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  3. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    Friend, there are people seeking out authenticity, orthodoxy and tradition. We have outgrown our chapel and are looking for somewhere more appropriate. Eac Sunday I see a new person/people at Mass and I give thanks
     
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  4. Ide

    Ide Active Member

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    Aidan,

    Thank you, brother. I understand that the conversations can get heated. I just want to point out that we are all Christians and working to a similar goal- to uphold the beautiful traditions of our respective churches. I've been in other forums (as a lurker) where the disputes over church history raise people's passions and cause discord. I hope that we can voice our views here amicably.
     
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  5. Ide

    Ide Active Member

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    I agree with you to a degree. I know that I am looking for tradition and when I find it, I rejoice! But I would venture that some people (at least in the U.S.) are also looking for novelty too. I've been in circles where people would rotate to the next thing in order to find a new, exotic identity. When that wore out and got boring to them (because it always did) they would look for something new. I think that the message of the church has to match a traditional liturgy- if it has modern changes, then the Mass or service can look very ancient and exciting, but not really represent the teaching realities of the church.

    I think that many churches are too dependent on services alone to bring people in the doors. What people are looking for is how to transform their lives, every single day. When the traditional services are match with meaningful spiritual practices and disciplines, I think we will see more strength return to the Christian West.
     
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  6. Tom

    Tom New Member Anglican

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    Having today gone to my first Roman Catholic Latin Mass today I understand your sentiment there. Though I don't understand Latin, (yet hopefully going to learn the basics soon) and therefore think the liturgy in the vernacular language of the people is necessary, it is still a beautiful form of adoration and worship.
     
  7. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    Tom , all our Missals have Latin on one side of the page and English on the other. We have the beauty of the language as well as understanding what is being said
     
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  8. Tom

    Tom New Member Anglican

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    My Anglo-Catholic parish combines the English Missal with Common Worship, so we have the Latin in parts or Latin translation next to the sung English.
     

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