Which Bible Translation Do You Prefer?

Discussion in 'Sacred Scripture' started by coton boy, Aug 11, 2015.

  1. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Maybe there are Catholic study Bibles available with that level of detailed annotation, but the noted that come with the standard Challoner Douay Rheims are fewer than those in the Geneva; they can be ignored. Otherwise it would not be one of my favourite Bibles.

    Oh, and I did it again, I forgot to expand a footnote.

    For those who noticed the * in my post on my three favorite bibles, during what we might call the Preface of Venting about Oxbridge (which normally I am disinclined to vent about, because I love the books they publish and my father went to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar in the 1950s, and being an Anglophile and a Posh Anglophile at that, I love Eton, Oxford, Cambridge and what they stand for), the remark was that it amuses me that despite not actually being in England or the United Kingdom, and having historically been a part of the Kingdom of Scotland, the Isle of Man is part of the Province of York, the Diocese of Sodor and Man, hence the fictional railway-saturated Isle of Sodor from the imagination of the Anglican priest Rev. W. Audrey, author of Thomas the Tank Engine and so on.

    But not as amusing as the fact that the formal title for a senior judge, jurist or member of the judiciary on the Island of Man is a Deemer, and I believe their chief justice is the Chief Deemer. I deem this guilty of being hilarious.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2019
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  2. mediaque

    mediaque Active Member

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    I really like the MEV and the KJVER. But of coarse, I always have the KJV as reference of the afor mentioned just in case, of passages I want to check for accuracy.
     
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  3. Religious Fanatic

    Religious Fanatic Well-Known Member

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    A lot of Douay's footnotes can be reconciled into a non-Romanist point of view, as with Geneva's Reformed commentary. It's honest enough to mention that passages like 1 John 5 and Revelation 12 may not mean what the RCCs sometimes say they mean. What offends me about the NAB is the liberal footnotes which has been mentioned many times by Catholics. The translation is supposed to be done by a 99% Catholic committee with the intention that it'll also be read by Protestants, and also that it is approved by the Vatican for all categories of use within the church. However, it has notes that offend even practicing Catholics (denies 1 Corinthians 3:15 speaks of purgatory despite being a prooftext in the catechism) and some that imply biblical errancy, like saying the Jewish view of the world is outdated when it speaks of water inside of the Earth which from what I understand was scientifically proven not too long ago. I've heard Catholics say, "Even Mormons and Jehovahs would be offended by it." If the Vatican's view of fostering ecumenism with us is that we be perceived as massive heretics to this degree from the start, then they went further than they should. Also, modern Catholic bibles accept the protestant renderings regarding verses pertaining to Mary like "full of grace" vs "favored one" which were originally points of contention.
     
  4. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Active Member

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    I have got to get me a new Bible soon. Not sure why but I just feel that I do. I am leaning towards the Orthdox Study Bible.
     
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  5. Religious Fanatic

    Religious Fanatic Well-Known Member

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    I have Hendrickson Publishing's fascimile of the original 1611 KJV with Apocrypha. They also offer one for the 1560 Geneva. I love traditional bibles, and anything published before pre-modern liberal scholarship is cool with me. I only use modern translations that stay close to the traditional ones as much as possible, like, as I said, New King James. I have a beautiful Douay-Rheims by Loreto publishing, and I want the Orthodox Study Bible. So once I get my hands on the Geneva fascimile and the OSB, we can reasonably say that I have several bibles from important competing groups as complimentary witnesses (Anglican, Roman, Orthodox, and Reformed Protestant).
     
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  6. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Get a vintage American Bible Society New Testament as well. One from the 1950s or 60s, with psalms, hymns and prayers in the appendix, or a pocket Gideon new testament with the Psalter and the Proverbs if you cannot find the former.
     
  7. Religious Fanatic

    Religious Fanatic Well-Known Member

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    I was blessed with a full Gideon hardcover NKJV that my mom brought home to me from a hotel while on vacation. I was stunned. She had no idea that I was looking for that specific version of the NKJV around the same time, when I ordered a Pocket Gideon NKJV with Proverbs/Psalms. That gave me a complimentary set. I had just purchased the Young Messiah film, which speculates on the childhood of Jesus. Knowing there could be possible heretical liberties, I suggested on reading the Gospel of Luke's chapters on those matters with my grandmother before viewing the film, so as to establish what is known from a biblical basis.
     
  8. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    The film in question is heretical, being a sanitized version of the Protoevangelion of Thomas and furthermore having a premise which is either Arian or at least Nestorian.
     
  9. Rhys

    Rhys Member

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    While I recognize the deficiencies of Textus Receptus and applaud the ongoing academic effort to 'recover' the original Greek New Testament, my primary concern has shifted away from fidelity to the critical text and toward avoiding the pernicious influence of the current era - at all costs. The King James Bible did not fail our fathers who, unlike us, did not have instant access to dictionaries, commentaries, concordances, and hundreds of translations to help guide them through the text. The Gospel was preached, believers were edified, and Christ was proclaimed. You can 'debate' modern 'scholars' 'til you're blue in the face but in the end, they'll just out-print ya. Four centuries of tradition! The world can't ever take it away.
     
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  10. Religious Fanatic

    Religious Fanatic Well-Known Member

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    Very true, very true. Like I said, KJV and if you need some help, NKJV. I got myself a copy of a greek Nestle-Aland New Testament and look forward to learning some greek to study it in-depth. It includes both early and later traditions of the texts, but indicates where they do or don't occur in the notes explained by the preface.
     
  11. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    Here's a very user friendly and basic primer on NT Greek. There are two courses of study. You can access all of the lessons for free. My Greek professor recommended the site: http://ntgreek.net/about.htm
     
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  12. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    I have to confess I agree with your sentiments, except for your continued support for “recovering” the original text. I am baffled by this, given that you consider the textus receptus adequete and also have seen how textual criticism is used by modern scholars to pernicious ends. And what is wrong with the Textus Receptus? Those changes textual criticism would impose arguably weaken the text from a doctrinal perspective if we take, for once, a traditional approach to higher criticism. Thus the Comma Johanneum for example, even if it is an interpolation, seems canonical, since it agrees with and is effectively a clarifying gloss that reinforces the Trinitarian message therein conveyed by St. John without it, assuming, of course, that it is an interpolation.
     
  13. Dave Kemp

    Dave Kemp Member Anglican

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    King James is my go to bible but I do use ESV as well as it’s the standard for ACNA and I’m a member.
     
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  14. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    It's hard to say that anything is standard for ACNA. Just as Diocese of Quincy uses Common Worship and the REC has its own prayer book, I'm sure a variety of Bibles are being read each week. I'm confident most of the REC still reads the KJV. I've encountered a number of clergy who were all influenced by a professor at Trinity School for Ministry to use the NLT because it's more 'missional' - whatever that means.
     
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  15. Dave Kemp

    Dave Kemp Member Anglican

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    The ESV is the standard bible of the ACNA, all scripture in the new 2019 BCP is from there. I live in Illinois and know Bishop Morales, a kind and godly man but we’ve no idea still why he’s banned it’s usage, sadly we are stuck with common worship



     
  16. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Morales banned the 2019 BCP? So you are using the 1979?
     
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  17. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    No. He chose CoE's Common Worship, which they were already using for some reason.
     
  18. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Ewwwwww.
     
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  19. Dave Kemp

    Dave Kemp Member Anglican

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    No, common worship!
     
  20. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Horrors!
     
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