Which Bible Translation Do You Prefer?

Discussion in 'Sacred Scripture' started by coton boy, Aug 11, 2015.

  1. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    572
    Likes Received:
    286
    Religion:
    ACNA

    Oh I got you.
     
  2. Moses

    Moses Member

    Posts:
    41
    Likes Received:
    31
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Orthodox Christian
    For the daily office, and anytime I'm reading aloud I use the King James. I also use a dramatized audio KJV for listening.

    I also have on my shelf:
    - The Douay Rheims, Challoner revision
    - The English Standard Version
    - The New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: Revised Standard Version
    - The Orthodox Study Bible
    - The Septuagint with Apocrypha by Sir Lancelot Brenton
    - EOB: New Testament by Fr. Laurent Cleenewerk
    - The New Testament: A Translation by David Bentley Hart

    The Douay Rheims and Brenton's I use for reference, to see what the Vulgate and the LXX have to say. The RSV is for when I want to silently read more than a chapter or two at once. Fr. Laurent's and DBH's are personally annoying for me since they're so different from the KJV and RSV which I'm used to, but I read them occasionally for that very reason. Fr. Laurent's New Testament also has the best appendices of any Bible I've owned.

    My ESV and Orthodox Study Bible almost never get used.
     
    Cooper likes this.
  3. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    572
    Likes Received:
    286
    Religion:
    ACNA
    I head there was a church fathers Bible. I would love to get one if that was true.
     
  4. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    1,574
    Likes Received:
    1,532
    Country:
    America
    Religion:
    Anglican
    The Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture
    https://www.ivpress.com/ancient-christian-commentary-on-scripture

    This is the gold standard.

    I have the "Catena" app on my phone, which is a mini gold standard of its own. You have the verses of Scripture, click on one, and for it pop up the commentaries on it from Ambrose, or Chrysostom, or "Severus of Antioch, AD 538":

    IMG_E0ADF0DBF443-1.jpeg
     
    Cooper and Moses like this.
  5. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    572
    Likes Received:
    286
    Religion:
    ACNA
    Only over 1000 for the book copies
     
  6. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    1,275
    Likes Received:
    626
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Christian
    The Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture is just a hair out of my price range.... :laugh:

    The vast array of writings from the church fathers—including much that is available only in the ancient languages—have been combed for their comment on Scripture. From these results, scholars with a deep knowledge of the fathers and a heart for the church have hand selected material for each volume, shaping, annotating, and introducing it to today's readers.
    It causes me a bit of concern to see that they don't present all of what the early fathers wrote about a subject, but rather they pick and choose (hand selecting, and shaping) what the reader gets to see. Although it might be entirely accurate in portraying what was then believed and taught, the potential seemingly exists for some editorializing to have taken place, don't you think?
     
  7. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    1,574
    Likes Received:
    1,532
    Country:
    America
    Religion:
    Anglican
    There's certainly at least a hypothetical chance of that, given how much else today is "shaped" by the manipulative powers that be.

    That being said, in this particular case I haven't heard of anything worrysome, so the editors can be trusted. If even a few concerning "shapings" emerge in the future, then the entire series will be besmirched, so they know that they are treading a fine line.

    I also don't think you could have literally everything written by everyone, because the ancient times had a very high rate of literacy, and thus there are so many more books available that you could easily result in a collection 5-10x the current size.

    The only format where it would be possible to functionally make all of the the ancient commentaries available, is online. There could be 100k or 200k pages in the database, but you'd only be exposed to the 15-20 writers on the one verse you were checking up on.

    But in terms of a print format, I can't imagine the absolute entirety of the ancient commentaries getting printed in one set.
     
    Cooper likes this.
  8. Ananias

    Ananias Member Anglican

    Posts:
    95
    Likes Received:
    62
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    ACNA
    I thought about picking up this set, but reconsidered and just bought the 32-volume Hendricks set of the Church fathers writings instead. It was expensive, but you get the full texts and not just excerpts. The translations are a bit old -- the original editions were put out in the 1880's I believe -- but they are quite comprehensible for a modern reader. It can be hard to find the full 32-volume run, however; if you use Logos or Accordance software, it's both easier to cheaper to get it in an electronic edition (which also takes up much less shelf space).

    My favorite Bible now and for many years is the ESV, specifically the hardcover edition with the center-column references. I've been buying fake-leather Bibles for a long time, but just lately I've joined the hardcover mafia. I'm no longer a fan of floppy covers or gilded pages. Modern Smyth-sewn hardcovers lie flat even in Genesis and Revelation, so I find it a better form-factor. I'm not crazy about study bibles as a general rule, but I also find the ESV study bible a valuable resource.
     
    Cooper and Stalwart like this.
  9. Fr. Brench

    Fr. Brench Active Member Anglican

    Posts:
    132
    Likes Received:
    194
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Anglican (ACNA)