The RCC

Discussion in 'Church History' started by Traditionalist, Jan 11, 2019 at 12:13 PM.

  1. Traditionalist

    Traditionalist New Member

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    When did the Roman Catholic Church become THE Roman Catholic Church? When would we say that they strayed from the true apostolic teachings for the doctrines of the medieval church?
     
  2. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    1054 | Clearly up until July 1054 there was the Church, and that which was to be the Roman Catholic Church was the church of the Western Rite focussed around the western Patriarch, the Bishop of Rome.

    1198 | Pope Innocent III, Profession of Faith prescribed for the Waldensians: "With our hearts we believe and with our lips we confess but one Church, not that of the heretics, but the Holy Roman Catholic and Apostolic Church, outside which we believe that no one is saved"

    1215 | At the Fourth Lateran Council, "There is but one universal Church of the faithful, outside which no one at all is saved." Whilst we can argue that this was taught by the Fathers, including notably Clement, the force of the point here was to highlight to the Eastern Church their peril in being disconnected from the see of Peter.

    1302 | Pope Boniface VIII in the Bull Unam Sanctam "We are compelled in virtue of our faith to believe and maintain that there is only one holy Catholic Church, and that one is apostolic. This we firmly believe and profess without qualification. Outside this Church there is no salvation and no remission of sins, … We declare, say, define, and pronounce that it is absolutely necessary for the salvation of every human creature to be subject to the Roman Pontiff."

    1441 | Council of Florence "The most Holy Roman Church firmly believes, professes and preaches that none of those existing outside the Catholic Church, not only pagans, but also Jews and heretics and schismatics, can have a share in life eternal; but that they will go into the "eternal fire which was prepared for the devil and his angels" (Matthew 25:41), unless before death they are joined with Her; "

    My view is that the understanding of the nature of the Church changed markedly through this period, and that much of this is understood in the matters that led to the great schism, and the question of how much authority was to be found in the primacy of the Pontiff. Much of this found expression in the events of the 14th of February 1014, when the filioque clause was used in Rome for the first time.
     

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