New Prayer Book

Discussion in 'Liturgy, and Book of Common Prayer' started by Jeffg, May 14, 2019.

  1. Will_

    Will_ Member

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    That's a good question due to the similarities in the names, but those really are two different BCPs. The "proposed 1928 BCP" refers to a version that was put forth for adoption in the Church of England but never got the votes in Parliament to be adopted - hence the name "proposed". Wikipedia has an entry on it that can be read here:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Common_Prayer_(1928)

    The 1928 BCP that is still used in some U.S. jurisdictions is, of course, an American version that did get the needed approval.
     
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  2. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    The latter is the Deposited Book intended by the Church of England to replace the 1662 book, but which was blocked by Parliament (although a majority of Anglican members voted for it). I like it slightly more than the 1928 American book, because it includes offices for Prime and Compline, and features the English style Preces to the Divine Office (“O Lord make haste to help us...”), which was introduced in the US in the Rite I liturgy of the 1979 BCP, but previously we followed the Scottish format and used a shorter Preces, which one finds in the 1928 BCP.

    You can compare all of the above, and most other BCP editions, here:
    http://justus.anglican.org/resources/bcp/england.htm
     
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  3. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Something made easier by the fact that the American book did not require the consent of non-Anglicans in the House of Commons. The C of E now has more autonomy on liturgical matters, which is in theory good, except it resulted in the propagation of Common Worship. In general, however, the experience of Anglican liturgical diversification in the former colonial provinces and the national provinces outside of England, provides us with a fascinating study into the pros and cons of a state church vs. the separation thereof.

    This also creates a correlation with the experience of the state Lutheran and Reformed churches formerly and presently existing in what became the German Empire, the Netherlands, and Northern Europe, and of course, the national churches of the Orthodox communions (most of which existed historically, but several of which disappeared into the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople and to a much lesser, but still unfortunate extent, the Moscow Patriarchate (resulting in, for example, the temporary suppression of Georgian liturgical traditions), due to Turkocratia, only to re-emerge in the 19th and 20th century, in a manner similar to how regional Patriarchates in Western Europe, for example, those using the Gallican Rite, were forcibly converted to the Roman liturgy and lost their ecclesiastical autonomy in the 10th century, on the eve of the Great Schism).
     
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  4. Peteprint

    Peteprint Well-Known Member Anglican

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    The posting I made was redundant, but I don't know how to delete it.
     
  5. Magistos

    Magistos Active Member Anglican

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    As an aside, the 2019 ACNA BCP has been received, and is now shipping. My copy is due to arrive by July 2. I'll let you know when it arrives, if you have any questions.
     
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  6. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Any word on whether they will be releasing it into the public domain following the 250 year old Episcopal tradition?
     
  7. Magistos

    Magistos Active Member Anglican

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  8. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Yes, but thats not the same as being public domain. They have retained the copyright on the New Coverdale Psalter, which is rather integral, and which makes no sense (are they afraid the Episcopalians will use it? Because that is highly unlikely, and if the ECUSA does use it vs. some ultra liberal, gender-neutral psalter of their own connivance, that would be a good thing; by closing off the Psalter the ACNA is practically guaranteeing the new Episcopal BCP will be a horror show, as bad as possible).
     
  9. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    On a more positive note, the typography in the 2019 BCP is amazing. It is surely the most typographically elegant full BCP since the 1928 Standard Edition, on a par with the Arrion Press prospectus for the unpublished 1979 Standard Edition.

    Is ACNA doing a collectible folio-sized, or otherwise luxurious, Standard Edition?
     
  10. mediaque

    mediaque Active Member

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    I'm actually rather intrigued by the 2019 BCP. Not sure as of yet that I will purchase it, but I am definitely interested to see how it sets with people. So far, the reviews that I have read thus far, seem to be mostly positive.
     
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  11. Magistos

    Magistos Active Member Anglican

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    Well, I have my copy now and it says this:
    "With the exception of the New Coverdale Psalter, the content of the Book of Common Prayer (2019) is not under copyright, and all not for profit reproduction of the content by churches and non profit organizations is permitted. The New Coverdale Psalter is copyright 2019 by the Anglican Church in North America, but this is not intended to discourage the use and duplication of the text by churches for purposes of worship."
     
  12. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Indeed so. But if it were fully public domain, including the Psalter, that would be better yet IMO.
     
  13. Dave Kemp

    Dave Kemp Member Anglican

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    I received my copy of the 2019 BCP Saturday, I've read that it has prayers for the dead and prayers to the saints. I have briefly looked at it but not in any detail yet, can anyone help with that? Is it just an Anglo-Catholic rehash? For personal prayer I’ll be staying with my tried and tested 1662.
     
  14. Fr. Brench

    Fr. Brench Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Prayers for the departed "re-entered" Anglican practice after the Great War, during that time of major societal and theological shake-up. The American 1928 Prayer Book thus restored the 1549 Prayer Book's prayer(s) for the departed at the end of the Prayer for the Whole State of Christ's Church in the Communion liturgy, and the 2019 BCP does basically the same thing.

    As prayers go, it's pretty soft: "We remember before you all your servants who have departed this life in your faith and fear, that your will for them may be fulfilled; and we ask you to give us grace to follow the good examples of all your saints, that we may share with them in your heavenly kingdom."

    The italicized phrase is, I belief, the only line of departure from the content of the 1662's prayers, though someone more used to it may correct me if I'm wrong. From my perspective, the wording used here is 'soft' enough to ameliorate most of the evangelical objections to prayers for the departed, allowing it to be read simply in the context of the departed awaiting the general resurrection. But there are more hard-liners, of course, who won't put up even with that.
     
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  15. Dave Kemp

    Dave Kemp Member Anglican

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    Thanks for the reply, I know at home after the Great War people wanted to pray for loved ones lost. From what you quoted I probably won’t have a problem with it then.
     
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