Lutheran Hymns

Discussion in 'Sacred Music' started by Fidei Defensor, Mar 23, 2019.

Tags:
  1. Fidei Defensor

    Fidei Defensor Active Member

    Posts:
    223
    Likes Received:
    52
    Country:
    Kingdom of Heaven
    Religion:
    Christian
    I think we can appreciate Martin Luther’s strides, that he helped launch The Reformation, discovered the Agape of God in Romans, formulated the age old truth in the Scriptures of salvation by faith (Philippians 3:9, Ephesnians 2:5-9), and his early writings were full of tenderness, “we must be tender towards are Roman (religion) neighbor, and give them time to come our way in the reforms. For some are running ahead of us in reform, others walk, and some are but crawling. So let us be patient and kind towards them as they grow.” (From The Ninety-Five Theses and Other Writings, Martin Luther, Penguin Publishers, Ebook ISBN: 9780698187931) . Granted, later he became a crumpus and even contradicted his major hallmarks.

    It is without question that his hymns are very catchy, especially A Mighty Fortess Is Our God.
     
    Liturgyworks and Anglican04 like this.
  2. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    1,071
    Likes Received:
    834
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Anglican (ACNA)
    Indeed, the Lutheran hymnody is one of the major gifts to the wider Church
     
  3. Jeffg

    Jeffg Member

    Posts:
    59
    Likes Received:
    37
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Lutherpalian
    Having been brought up as Lutheran, I do appreciate the music. Not much on the modern "rock n preach" services that I see at non-liturgical churchs
     
    Liturgyworks and Fidei Defensor like this.
  4. Fidei Defensor

    Fidei Defensor Active Member

    Posts:
    223
    Likes Received:
    52
    Country:
    Kingdom of Heaven
    Religion:
    Christian
    Same here. The modern worship feels like its trying so hard mimic pop culture music (and its sales) rather than usher you into the presence of the Lord Trinity.
     
    Liturgyworks likes this.
  5. Jeffg

    Jeffg Member

    Posts:
    59
    Likes Received:
    37
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Lutherpalian
    I agree. I've been to church "services" where it feels more like entertainment then worship
     
    Liturgyworks likes this.
  6. Fidei Defensor

    Fidei Defensor Active Member

    Posts:
    223
    Likes Received:
    52
    Country:
    Kingdom of Heaven
    Religion:
    Christian
  7. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Active Member

    Posts:
    138
    Likes Received:
    102
    Country:
    US
    Religion:
    Orthodox Christian
    I really like what we might call “High-church Lutheran music,” that is to say, the masses, motets and cantatas composed by Bach, Schubert and other composers. As far as the Lutheran type hymn, the chorale in four part harmony, I grew up singing these, and I greatly like them, however, after exposure to the anthems and canticles of Anglicanism, and the chant of the old Latin Rites and the Eastern churches, I feel that type of music should lead, but the chorale, as found in, for example, the incredibly good English Hymnal of 1906 or the Episcopal Hymnal of 1940, should have a clearly defined liturgical role, which ideally would entail providing proper congregational hymns related to the proper scripture lessons and the collect of the Liturgy of the Faithful. But because people aren’t bothering to do Mattins and the Litany, the result is in a typical 1979 BCP service, all of that musical bliss we would get in Mattins from the Psalms and anthem, and a vestigial liturgy, are crammed into the main service, along with a reduced number of chorales compared with what we would get otherwise, and this is a tragedy.

    Part of the fight to restore traditional Anglicanism has to center around making Mattiins, the Litany and Evensong ubiquitous, while utterly removing from the entire Anglican communion praise and worship music, which in my opinion, by destroying traditional worship and confusing people’s ideas about what worship, as Jeffg mentions, cause as much damage as, for example, the capitulation of the church on the issues of human sexuality or the ordination of women. Because lex orandi, lex credendi is such an essential part of Anglicanism and the other traditional churches, if disruptive music is allowed which is not prayerful, which falls outside of the traditional categories of Anglican music (organ preludes and postludes, chorale hymns such as those by Luther, canticles, anthems, and the intonation of the preces, psalms and other things, by means of Anglican chant or Plainsong), it has a deleterious effect of the meaning of the worship as a whole, even if the priest himself is a traditionalist who does not deviate from tje form contained in the BCP.

    Thus, the congregational chorale becomes of vital importance, especially those by Luther, Charles Wesley and so on which can be said to have a strong doctrinal content. Singing them has an effect similiar to the congregational recitation of the three creeds.
     
    Brigid and Shane R like this.
  8. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Active Member

    Posts:
    138
    Likes Received:
    102
    Country:
    US
    Religion:
    Orthodox Christian
    I met a chap at a non denominational church where I had to exit the “nave” due to the unpleasant praise and worship music, and this poor man after we had chatted for a fee minutes then entered the nave, saying he “wanted to get some worship in.” They have redefined worship as attending a rock concert! And these forms of music which praise and worship bands copy in many cases are copied from the music of people who were not pious Christians, but were rather countercultural musicians whose religious views ranged from eccentric Oriental mystical atheism, like the Beatles, to satanism and the occult (various death metal musicians, and so on).

    Herbert Howells, who I consider the most talented Anglican musician, and one of the three most talented church musicians, of the 20th century (the other two being Michaelides and Rachmaninoff), warned about this, in a lecture he gave in 1971, which I can try to hunt for on YouTube if anyone is interested; his lecture warned that the organ loft was a sacred place, and the introduction of inappropriate church music would be a disaster, which the musical directors of Anglican churches had a responsibility to prevent, instead preserving the musical traditions of the church.

    And it should be stressed on that point that in contrast to Praise and Worship music, the Lutheran chorales, later composed in Britain with such a great effect by Charles Wesley, Vaughan Williams, and others, and the traditional systems of chant (plainsong and Gregorian chant, and the other forms of Latin chant and Eastern chant, such as Ambrosian, Byzantine, Coptic “tasbeha”, Znamenny chant of Russia, and others), and the four part harmony derived from it, used in Anglican anthems from the era of Renaissance Polyphony until the present, and in chant systems like Anglican Chant or Prostopinije, were all developed by, in and for the church. The early church it is known in the West initially avoided melody and relied on an ascetic monotony (and monotone chant can still be heard in 1950s recordings of Choral Evensong, during the confiteor); in the East, based on a dream St. Ignatius of Antioch had of two choirs of angels singing alternately, an antiphonal system was developed, which according to ecclesiastical legend reached the West when St. Ambrose of Milan used it to keep the spirits of his congregation up, when they were holding vigil in a besieged church the Emperor had declared should be given over to the Arians (this, perhaps the oldest sit-in on record, worked). From there, we have the development in Gregorian, Byzantine, West Syriac, and derived systems of chant, like the older forms of Slavonic chant, the eight modes or tones, which survive in Plainsong, and then from there, the next step was Renaissance Polyphony followed by four part harmony and tonality, which first appeared in early Protestant hymnody like the Lutheran chorales, and some Calvinist hymns, such as the melody known as “The Old 100th.” And from there, increasingly sophisticated music was written, taking us to the exquisite, contemplative, prayerful compositions of Herbert Howells, George Dyson and Healey Willan. So that is one system of music, developed in the Church, for the Church, free from heretical and pagan influence, and the introduction of rock music destroys that.
     
  9. Edmundia

    Edmundia Member

    Posts:
    40
    Likes Received:
    18
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Religion:
    Roman Catholic (Tradition
    Herbert Howells,YES. What about Healey Willan ? a much forgotten and underused composer of good liturgically centred music. Any other greats of the 20th c. ? Lloyd Webber (of All Saints',Margaret Street, London), George Oldroyd, ???? any others who are in the "classical tradition" ?
     
  10. Brigid

    Brigid Member

    Posts:
    49
    Likes Received:
    23
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    LCMS/AngloCatholic
    I will (surprisingly for me) put in a good word for Praise and Worship music. Due to the time I can go to Divine Service I am only able to make one of my church's services and it's one of the Contemporary services(although on Easter and one other time I was able to go to the Traditional service, which is true to this geographical area so quite casual). The music at this service is always good Christian pop that I wouldn't mind listening to at home, just not at church. The vocalists have amazingly good voices which I love listening to and the background instrumental stays in the background. There are no strange light effects, the video screen doesn't cover the altar, and there is never actual rock music or (perish the thought) heavy metal. The words are somewhat shallow, however they always pay attention to Him and what He's done - not to the congregant. From a died-in-the-wool high church traditionalist, that's quite a lot to acknowledge, but I must be honest and maybe I'm too set in my ways. Maybe He wants me to broaden my horizons.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2019 at 4:46 PM

Share This Page