Is the Eucharist reserved or not?

Discussion in 'Sacraments, Sacred Rites, and Holy Orders' started by nkygreg, Nov 5, 2012.

  1. nkygreg

    nkygreg Member

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    In the Anglican/ Episcopal Church are the remnants of Holy Communion reserved?
     
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  2. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    In the Anglican Church of Canada, many Anglo-Catholics reserve the blessed bread, which they revere and venerate as the Holy Sacrament.

    Example: St. George's Round Church, 1811: you can just see the white tabernacle beneath the Cross, above the middle "Holy":

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Dave

    Dave Active Member

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    Yes reserved to take to sick, homebound, etc
    Venerated, prayed to, etc = no
     
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  4. Symphorian

    Symphorian Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the Sacrament may be reserved. In my Diocese it's quite common for middle of the road and High/Anglo-Catholic churches to do so. The Sacrament is commonly reserved in an Aumbry which is a small safe built into the wall of the church and is generally situated close to an Altar. A light will burn by the Aumbry whilst the Sacrament is reserved. The Aumbry may also house the Holy Oils. Anglo-Catholic churches may copy common Roman practice and reserve in a Tabernacle either on the High Altar or a side Altar. In pre-Reformation England a hanging Pyx over the Altar was the common means of reservation. A few English churches still reserve this way. (The Cathedral in my Diocese has a hanging Pyx). Some 'Low' churches also reserve the Sacrament but generally not in a prominent way - they may, for example, reserve the Sacrament in a safe in the vestry/vicarage for Communion of the sick. In my parish church the Sacrament is reserved in an Aumbry in the Lady Chapel and is used for Communion of the sick only. As Consular mentions in the above post, some Anglo-Catholic churches will use the Reserved Sacrament for worship such as Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament or Adoration.
     
  5. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    The rector of our round church, ordained in Ely, genuflects towards the tabernacle whenever he enters the church/sanctuary. Can that be considered within the bounds of "veneration"?
     
  6. CatholicAnglican

    CatholicAnglican Active Member

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    My former church used an aumbry for reserving the Blessed Sacrament. Right now the church I am with uses a pyx to reserve the Blessed Sacrament since we are only 13 strong at the moment
     
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  7. CatholicAnglican

    CatholicAnglican Active Member

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    Also since our Lord is truly present in His Body reserved, we should give our Lord Jesus due honour and adoration in His most Blessed Sacrament. "Let us adore forever, the Most Holy Sacrament"
     
  8. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Says your theological tradition. Some of the Fathers and Divines disagree ;) but your way certainly exists, so it answers the OP.

    Adore the Man, not the symbols!
     
  9. CatholicAnglican

    CatholicAnglican Active Member

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    Also the medieval church used a Columba or Dove made of silver, gold or latten to reserve the Blessed Sacrament
     
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  10. Dave

    Dave Active Member

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    On a side note: The Eastern Orthodox will preserve in a dove above the altar. They do not give it benediction / adoration / veneration.
     
  11. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    They are but they are not supposed to, unfortunately, most Anglicans, especially clergy openly deny Anglicanism's confession of faith (subsequently breaking their ordination vows).
     
  12. historyb

    historyb Active Member

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    We do in my CEC parish
     
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  13. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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    They reserve Communion in every Anglican church that I've ever visited
     
  14. Aaytch Barton

    Aaytch Barton Active Member

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    Agreed. Reservation of sacrament is forbidden. An excuse offered is that it is more convenient when visiting the sick and homebound. I have always been curious about this; why is it inconvenient to consecrate at the time of visitation?
     
  15. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    "Convenience", i.e. laziness. Only possible excuse. Also, some have a theology whereby the Eucharist can only take place on Sunday in a church, or in a church gathering of some sort. Apparently the old and sick are excluded from that.
     
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  16. Robert

    Robert Active Member

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    So for those that want the Sacrament to be consecrated in the home of the sick person being visited I take it you do not belive that laity should be taking the reserved Sacrament to the sick. Is that right?
     
  17. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    Anglicanism's theology of presence doesn't allow for reservation. That, and the practice is explicitly condemned in the Articles and Prayer Book.
     
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  18. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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    The BCP mentions use of the Reserved Sacrament on p. 282 (Good Friday) and p. 396 (Communion under Special Circumstances).
     
  19. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    I'm talking about the 1662 BCP, the formulary.
     
  20. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Do we really have to judge by what each BCP has? Different times put up different practices. We need an unchanging, solid standard... like... the Divine Scriptures! The Fathers wouldn't hurt either. :)

    All this haggling over which BCP says what can only serve to "prove" to the world that we're just a bunch of vacillating protestants.
     
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