inerrancy of the New Testament

Discussion in 'Sacred Scripture' started by apologetic, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    From an academic point of view there are a few issues:

    • I am not sure what the strength of 'divinely inspired' when you have aldready said God was doing the inspiring.
    • I find reading 'my words shall not pass away' as the New Testament seems to strain the text. The New Testament suggests that Jesus said
    1. Love one another as God has first loved you
    2. Serve one another as I have served you
    3. Do this in remembrance (as my anamnesis)
    4. May they all be one
    How well we have done this may be a matter of discussion, however I would argue those words have not passed awsy as Jesus said they would not.
     
  2. Tiffy

    Tiffy Active Member

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    The background, life experience and foundational beliefs and personality of all translators of Holy Scripture profoundly affect the 'flavour' of their translations. That much I think is irrefutable. That though, is not to say that their understanding of the meanings of words and sentences in the original language in which the New Testament was written, must necessarily, be either correct or in error in every instance.

    Hort, being a Darwinist may have little bearing on his understanding of the Greek lexicon, though it might have affected his translating choices where either a 'literal' or a more metaphorical nuance was offered in the original. His belief in purgatory may have influenced his treatment of some passages but equally a belief in Hell, (as portrayed by medievil artists, leaving an abiding simplistic 'folk memory' ) might have influenced others just as much.

    His doubt of the eficacy of Christ's atonement is a bigger problem since that affects his whole attitude to the primary purpose of all the scripture. His translation of the words of the scriptures without an understanding of the purpose for which New Testament scripture was written would be in my opinion a major obstacle to his understanding and therefore the accuracy of meaning of his translation.

    His attendance at seanaces indicates to me a degree of foolishness I would not normally associate with competent scholarship, but it was 'fashionable' at one time and he might just have been driven by curiosity. Founding occult societies though rings alarm bells. I'm quite sure that I would get little spiritual food from reading a translation of The Holy Scriptures penned by the likes of Elymus (BarJesus). Acts 13:6-13. No matter what his supposedly scholarly credentials might have been.
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  3. Tiffy

    Tiffy Active Member

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    I see your point, but surely we must have many more 'words of Jesus' faithfully preserved in scripture than just the examples you quoted. Even if all Bibles were destroyed, there would still be a residue of the 'words of Jesus' preserved on earth by the invisible church, while any believing disciple remained alive. Even if those words remained only in someone's memory. Beyond that there is also the possibility that Christ's 'words' are 'eternal', in the same way that he himself is 'Eternal', so even if his words are no longer known on earth, they would still exist eternally Mark 13:31 and therefore are independantly self sustaining, being neither dependent upon 'heaven' nor 'earth' for their continuous existence.
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  4. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    I was by no means forcing a limit, but I was pointing to another way of understanding the text. There has been an early coptic manuscript of the Gospel of Thomas found, which whilst not taken as canonical is a source independent of the canon which contains a number of utterances from Jesus many of which line up with statements in the canonical gospels.

    Christ, of course, is the eternal word whose beginning is before the beginning and whose ending is after the ending, and within his compass the entire expanse of time is held.
     

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