I am starting my journey to ordination.

Discussion in 'New Members' started by Lloyd Hobbard-Mitchell, Sep 25, 2020.

  1. Lloyd Hobbard-Mitchell

    Lloyd Hobbard-Mitchell New Member

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    I am an Englishman living in Thailand, about three hours drive to Bangkok, where I have lived for 9 years now.

    I am married (Susi) and my son, Sebastian, is 3 and a half. I have been working as a teacher online to Chinese students for about three years (since the boy was born); I work form home and can share in the care of my boy.

    Covid has hit us particularly badly and my wife’s business has all but gone to the wall with no real prospect over the next 3-5 years of that recovering. I need to explore a long term future for me and the family which coincided with my have a rather profound and spiritual experience.

    Over the last 20-odd years I have considered at various points following a path into the clergy.

    I had worked for nearly twenty years for various homelessness charities, which at the time was always more important.

    Since 2008, when I changed direction into the private sector, I have probably, twice a month at least, returned to the issue and for one reason or another thought it was not the right time. Suffice to say that the nagging voice which has now interrupted my consciousness has not receded and having tried various avenues with varying success and satisfaction I am beginning to feel compelled to explore my options seriously with a view of fulfilling a service/career within the Church.

    Most recently, I hit a bit of a spiritual crossroads and I decided to commit my life there and then to Christ as I have been considering on and off for so long.

    I have made a little video describing my moment of calling HERE.

    There are some obvious constraints:

    1) I live in Thailand

    2) I need to work to maintain an income for my family (Wife and Son) whilst I commit to any formal training or qualifications.

    3) I have looked online and the cost of pursuing a respectable correspondence 2-year Masters in Theology course is prohibitive.

    In spite of this, there must be a way.

    I am confident in my abilities to relate to folk and fulfil any challenging calling thrown at me.

    So I have questions which you, or someone you know, may well be in a position to answer in order that I might work toward becoming an ordained priest.

    1) Might my years working as I did with homeless folk count for something?

    2) Might by experience working here in Thailand help my cause?

    3) Might the teaching I have done (10,000+ hours) be useful?

    4) What is the best route for me to take?

    5) Might there be funding for studying?

    I am looking for any guidance from you and eagerly await your ideas.

    With prayers and best wishes+

    Lloyd.
     
  2. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Well-Known Member

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    What is Chonburi?
     
  3. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    Hi Lloyd, and welcome among us.

    1) I live in Thailand
    2) I need to work to maintain an income for my family (Wife and Son) whilst I commit to any formal training or qualifications.
    3) I have looked online and the cost of pursuing a respectable correspondence 2-year Masters in Theology course is prohibitive.​

    1. Living in Thailand is your reality. The Anglican website says that there are about 510 Anglicans in Thailand. I am not sure how up to date the website is, however I tak it that the Anglican presence in Thailand is small. One of the things you don't talk about in your YouTube is your current status in the Anglican Church in Thailand, and the priestly vocation is found in living out that faith inside the community of faith.
    2. Living in Family is also your reality. Many these days find similar realities, and the Church in the West has struggled with many alternative modes including part time study, and correspondence education and the like.
    3. I presume that your looking at a Masters in Theology means that you have a primary degree. The degree of course may come later. Getting your hands of some sensible serious theology books will help, including the ones you will not agree with.

    1) Might my years working as I did with homeless folk count for something?
    2) Might by experience working here in Thailand help my cause?
    3) Might the teaching I have done (10,000+ hours) be useful?
    4) What is the best route for me to take?
    5) Might there be funding for studying?
    1. Yes
    2. Yes
    3. Yes
    4. Say your prayers, talk you your 'Parish Priest', and then talk to your Bishop.
    5. There may be, however the depth of your relationship with Christ will be far more important than any academic study.
    Hope all goes well.
     
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  4. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    Province South East of Bangkok
     
  5. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

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    For those whom God calls, God provides a way. Matthew 7:7-11 comes to mind.
     
  6. Cooper

    Cooper Member Anglican

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    According to this link, Chon Buri appears to be a tropical resort.

    Hmmm...

    Apostle Paul worked as a tent maker Acts 18:1-4.

    Maybe you can tell us a little about your ministry call from God?
     
  7. Lloyd Hobbard-Mitchell

    Lloyd Hobbard-Mitchell New Member

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    You are correct, I met my wife in Bangkok when I first moved here and I followed her work to Chonburi since she managed (up until COVID) 5 concierge/ tour and excursion desks within international standard hotels (3, 4 and 5 stars).

    As far as the moment when I knew what I needed to do, I can only describe as if a blindfold had been removed. Everything up to that moment suddenly makes sense. It was like that moment in a puzzle when there is a clear direction and generally speaking all the pieces you have left have a specific place to go. I will need to do an update on YouTube but I have started studying, using EdX.com and Coursera. I have also been directed to an online course offered by the London Diocese.
     
  8. Lloyd Hobbard-Mitchell

    Lloyd Hobbard-Mitchell New Member

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    Hehe! I thought it said 'Region' - I had my old glasses on!! Thank you!!
     
  9. Cooper

    Cooper Member Anglican

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    From what little I know about your current situation -- your wife works in the tourism business and the two of you have a 3-year old son at home.

    I suggest you do the following.

    (a) Do what you can to develop a Christian home environment for your wife and 3-year old son.

    (b) Prepare yourself to homeschool your 3-year old son in a Christian tradition (it does not have to be Anglican / Church of England). There are plenty of online homeschool Christian materials to help you do this.

    (c) Set up a routine of prayer several times a day. The Holy Spirit will speak and lead you.

    :pray2:

    Cooper
     
  10. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    I am a priest. I can point you to very affordable theological education. It might not get the approval of the Church of England but it could meet your needs. PM me if interested.
     
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  11. Annie Grace

    Annie Grace New Member

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    I am discerning the priesthood in Australia. I have been told by my bishop to have a meeting with my parish priest first and then to meet with him. I think before you start any more studies, you might want to connect with your parish priest and your bishop because you won't get very far without their support.
     
  12. Tiffy

    Tiffy Well-Known Member

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    The CoE prefers to accept ordinands who already have a number of people from an Anglican community who know them and can assess their character and calling. How else can a persons suitability for the priesthood in the Anglican community be initially assessed?

    This will be followed up by much more rigorous enquiries and training which is aimed at helping them confirm their vocation.
    .
     
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  13. Annie Grace

    Annie Grace New Member

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    Yes, of course. I have been very fortunate to have a great deal of support from the bishop and my priest, but will be relying on the support of the community as well. And should it turn out that I don't actually have a vocation that leads to ordination, I know that I will find other ways to serve God within my parish. There is no harm in being open to possibilities, providing one is also realistic about expectations and prepared to accept the reality that unfolds and trust in God.
     
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  14. Tiffy

    Tiffy Well-Known Member

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    I wish you God speed in your vocation. :)
    .
     
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