Daily Office Group

Discussion in 'Personal Advice, Care & Prayers' started by Adam Warlock, Jun 16, 2012.

  1. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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  2. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    I lead Morning Prayer at my parish church on Mondays. Not sure if that counts for your question, though.
     
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  3. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    Well, it depends on the group you've got (or are planning to assemble). Since I lead at the parish, it's a well-established tradition, although we have low turnouts. You'll want to make sure you have plenty of Prayer Books and Bibles. It also helps to do a bit of page announcing, especially in the "Canticles" section, if you're using the 1979 liturgy. If you're meeting with people who are unfamiliar with the Daily Offices or Anglican liturgy, it's best to simplify the service to the bare minimum and probably print up sheets, rather than use the Prayer Books.
     
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  4. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

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    I haven't, but our Rector has asked for those interested to consider starting one. I'm considering it. . . .What are your thoughts on the start up, etc.?

    Good question.
    Anna
     
  5. Symphorian

    Symphorian Well-Known Member

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    Adam, this subject came up in the sermon this morning. Our Diocesan Bishop has started an initiative called 'Way of Life' to encourage us to take a more intentional and disciplined approach in our journey with God to help us be more conscious of our growth as Christians. Daily worship and prayer is one of the 'ways' that we are encouraged to adopt in our journey in response to the love of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit. One of the intentions of the BCP is found in the title itself - common prayer - it is adapted to the common needs of all. All worshipers use it, clergy and people.

    In the 1980's and 90's I used to attend evening prayer in church most weekdays as our Rectors at that time were in the habit of praying the Daily Office in church. I sometimes led them if the Rector was otherwise engaged. It was a rhythm of life that I greatly appreciated. Praying on one's own can sometimes be tough - I often forget that prayer is also about listening to God as well as speaking. Attending the Daily Office also increased my appreciation of scripture, particularly the Psalms.

    I also used to attend a Prayer Guild which was an Ecumenical group although mainly Anglican. We had a simple 'rule of life' including praying the Guild Office daily and intercession. We met in church on a monthly basis but were encouraged to meet in smaller groups between times. We had a monthly intercession list and used to phone each other up with emergency prayer requests when necessary. (Before email was common!).

    A church in a neighbouring village has some lovely contemplative evening services during the summer months which are very well attended. (I live in a rural area with small communities and many churches no longer hold regular Office services). These take the form of trad. 1662 Evensong through to Celtic style Evensong/Compline or Monastic style Compline and are mostly lay led. They have a mixture of recorded items such as church bells, church choirs, monks singing plainsong, celtic song etc...really whatever is appropriate to the theme. This is complimented by congregational participation with hymns, intercessions, scripture readings, poems, readings from the Church Fathers...again whatever is appropriate to the theme. They're held in a beautiful little seaside church with lots of lighted candles everywhere. I'm going to try something similar at my church in the next few weeks.

    When I attended daily EP we all sat in the choir. This gave a more intimate group feeling and a greater sense of participation. We were encouraged to take turns reading lessons and leading the intercessions. We all felt that we had an active role in the group.
     
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  6. Symphorian

    Symphorian Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I agree. The summer evening services that I've experienced in the neighbouring parish really capture a feeling of calm and peace. I was sceptical when I first heard about them because many smaller parishes roundabouts have given up on Evensong because of declining attendance. I was stunned however to find that these were very well attended - the atmosphere created by the appropriate music and gentle light of the candles just seemed to transform it. I would leave the service with a feeling of regeneration. Many others commented the same.

    As a church musician myself I of course believe that music enhances and transforms worship to another level. Whilst live music is desirable, many churches now don't seem to have the resources to manage this. I believe that it's perfectly acceptable to make use of recorded or digital media in such situations.
     
  7. Scottish Monk

    Scottish Monk Well-Known Member

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    I have not--but would like to join a Daily Office prayer group.

    ...Scottish Monk
     
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  8. Scottish Monk

    Scottish Monk Well-Known Member

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    Do you have any suggestions for recorded or digital media, such as author, composer, music title, CD title? Do you think the music should accompany the Daily Office at specific points--or play as a background?

    ...Scottish Monk
     
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  9. Scottish Monk

    Scottish Monk Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for posting the above description. I want to be there this summer (but, alas, I live in the U.S.).

    ...Scottish Monk
     
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  10. Symphorian

    Symphorian Well-Known Member

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    The recorded music was used in context rather than as background music. For example, with the trad 1662 Evensong, we entered the church to the sound of recorded bells (said church has no bells although most here do and are rung for real). The Psalms and Canticles were a recording of a choir singing Anglican Chant. I think there was a recorded anthem also. Hymns were a recorded organ to which the congregation sang.

    With the Monastic Compline we entered the church to the sound of recorded bells. The office Psalms were a recording of monks singing them to plainsong. Office hymns were again a recorded organ with the congregation singing along.

    The Celtic services were less structured. We entered the church to the sound of recorded Celtic instrumental music. There were periods for contemplative prayer during which instrumental music was played in the background. There were recorded Celtic style songs also.

    For the Celtic services, resources from the Northumbria Community were used. The Complines of the Northumbria Community were expanded upon.

    Music resources from the Northumbria Community:

    http://www.northumbriacommunity.org/community-resources-and-shop?page=shop.browse&category_id=8

    Daily Office of the Northumbria Community:

    http://www.northumbriacommunity.org/pray-the-daily-office

    Other recorded sources (Kevin Mayhew, Publisher):

    http://www.kevinmayhew.com/cds-dvds/church-resources.html

    Lots of Public Domain mp3's here:

    http://www.smallchurchmusic1.com/
     
  11. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

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    Adam,
    Good point--to find people who are already familiar with the Daily Office. Our Rector gave 3 or 4 one hour classes on how to use the BCP and find the elements of the Daily Office. It seemed very confusing even when clearly explained. lol. It's been easier to access the Daily Office online; but I really need to be able to do this one my own. Must master the process before considering volunteering to lead a group.

    Great thread Adam!

    Anna
     
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  12. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

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    Symphorian,
    I love every single post! Thanks so much for all the information. I hadn't thought about incorporating music either. Great links.

    I would love to hear any more suggestions you might have.

    Thank you so much!
    Anna
     
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  13. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

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    I know. We do miss things, don't we?

    Anna
     
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  14. Scottish Monk

    Scottish Monk Well-Known Member

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    Symphorian...

    You really have my interest, particularly when you start talking about Celtic music--maybe sometime we can start one or more Celtic threads on this forum. But for now, can you click on the first link and recommend three CDs of Celtic music available from Northumbria Community. Please send me the recommendations in a personal conversation post--just click on my name (to the left, above my avatar) and select "start a conversation."

    Thank you.

    ...Scottish Monk
     
  15. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

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  16. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    Why do you need so many ribbons? Two works fine for me, Collect and Psalter. The beauty of the Anglican Office is its simplicity.
     
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  17. Gordon

    Gordon Well-Known Member

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    Hi SM,

    If you can't find a group you could always download the DivineOffice app or go to it online and pray with the audio turned on so you feel like you are part of the office. http://divineoffice.org/
     
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  18. Gordon

    Gordon Well-Known Member

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    but it is really annoying when you accidentally take your finger out of the page the office is on.... I use the Daily Office SSO which also includes the community obedience prayers and it comes with 6 ribbons.

    1. in the calendar to follow the common or the feast days.
    2. in the office you are going to do next (morning, midday, evening or compline).
    3. in the psalter
    4. in the common or feast day (ours includes the special Franciscan feasts as well)
    5. common for the community obedience prayer (our rule states we must do the community obedience prayers daily)
    6. Third order principle for the day (1 thru 30)

    Once you have been doing it for a while it becomes second nature. I must admit I find the days I use the Anglican Breviary are a bit more complex to follow.
     
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  19. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

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    The author at this link: How to Pray the Daily Office from the Book of Common Prayer (Part 7) - Making it Easy (in fact, brainless. .) suggests using ribbons for the following:

    "Minimally:
    -Orders for Daily Prayer (75ff.)
    -Weekly Seasonal Collect (211ff.)
    -Psalms (585ff.)
    -Lectionary (936ff.)

    My Ideal:
    -Orders for Daily Prayer (75ff.)
    -Canticles in Morning Prayer – for use during Morning and Evening Prayer (85ff.)
    -Great Litany (148) (especially during Lent)
    -Weekly Season Collect (211ff.)
    -Holy Days Collects (237ff.)
    -Psalms (585ff.)
    -Prayers (810ff.)
    -Lectionary (936ff.) – unless of course you use my Readings Booklets!"

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. Gordon

    Gordon Well-Known Member

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    The BCP you all talk about here is not something we have here in Australia, the only BCP I have used in the past was 1662 version and that did not have the Daily Office in it, it only had the Order of Evening and Morning Prayer. That is what our local Priest would recite every day in my childhood church whether there was a congregation or not. The Eucharist was also recited every day, during the week it was at 6:30 AM I remember it well as I used to be the Server on Thursday mornings and did that until I was unable because I started a job. The Prayer Book for Australia has the Daily Office in it now, but does not have a daily lectionary, which means you either print a copy from the internet, buy a copy each year or have it on your iPad/iPhone like I do.

    Currently I am going through a reading plan to read the Bible cover to cover in a year, so during the Daily Office I use the first chapter of the old testament reading and the new testament reading as my first and second reading, and I use the morning and evening psalms as outlined in the daily office common lectionary as the psalms. The Daily Office SSO already has the collect for each common or feast day so there is no read the repeat the Sunday collect for the rest of the week.
     
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