World’s temperature has been flat for last 15 years

Discussion in 'The Commons' started by anglican74, Jun 19, 2022.

  1. Invictus

    Invictus Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    2,182
    Likes Received:
    1,119
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Episcopalian
    It’s time for the Right to just admit that they were wrong on global warming, and move on. The supporting evidence in favor of the theory is simply too great at this point.
     
  2. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    3,501
    Likes Received:
    1,791
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Anglican Christian
    We all exhale carbon dioxide every minute of our lives. I'm belching some CO2 as I type. :laugh:

    As for the ice caps, here is some helpful reading I came across this evening:
    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/06/20/ice-follies/
    https://everythingclimate.wpcomstaging.com/topics/antarctic-ice-melt/

    Then-prince (now king) Charles said in 2009 that he'd "calculated that we have just 96 months left to save the world" from global warming. I guess his royal math was a bit off.

    Even if we had incontrovertible evidence (which we don't) that atmospheric CO2 levels and global temperature have risen in tandem, the assumption of the global warming faithful depends upon the faulty assumption that correlation equals causation.

    Belief in man-made global warming requires great faith. Perhaps we should refer to proponents of this faith as "The Church of Global Warmists."
     
  3. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    2,041
    Likes Received:
    2,278
    Country:
    Australia
    Religion:
    Anglican
    I believe that we are poorly served by the likes of many. There are many books that might help. These three are all available on Amazon and are part of the Oxford University Press series A Very Short Introduction. I quite like OUP in that they tend to stand for scholarship and intellectual honesty, and they are written at a reasonable level without being impossible to follow.
    • Climate Change: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) 4th Edition by Mark Maslin.
    • Environmental Economics: A Very Short Introduction 1st Edition by Stephen Smith
    • Ecology: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) by Jaboury Ghazoul
    Most people in this area have stopped talking about global warming, and discuss the wider spectrum of Climate Change. Those of us who are Anglicans within the Anglican Communion, undoubtedly know and embrace the fifth mark of mission, To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation, and sustain and renew the life of the earth. I am not sure if Anglicans in the GAFcon have embraced a similar stance or not.

    I certainly do not believe that we are called to silence or cancel alternative views, however, in the current situation, there is more than enough to suggest that not all is well in the world of our stewardship of creation, entrusted to us by God to care for and delight in, I think we do need to recognise that we are in a relationship with the world around us, and we do need to nurture that which nurtures our very existence in this world.

    My view is that we should want to be part of the solution, not part of the problem. We believe in Creation, one way or another, and we believe in God as Creator, one way or another. Surely our love and respect for God should be mirrored in our care and nurture of the gift of this fragile blue dot.
     
    Tiffy likes this.
  4. Tiffy

    Tiffy Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    2,732
    Likes Received:
    1,237
    Country:
    UK
    Religion:
    CofE
    Agreed, and the mental attitude of 'fracking' Climate Change Deniers towards the planet that God has made is the same as that of the few kids who litter, smash up bus shelters, scrawl and spray grafitti all over the place, piss in lifts and shit in the kitchens of the houses they've burgled.
    .
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2022
  5. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    3,501
    Likes Received:
    1,791
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Anglican Christian
    That is because the "man-made global warming" narrative was not sustainable in the face of mounting evidence to the contrary 10-15 years ago. The move to "man-made climate change" was primarily a re-branding effort (similar to changing the name of Aunt Jemima syrup to 'Pearl Milling Company') combined with a bit of sleight-of-hand: they broadened the term so as to bring a few related issues, issues that are easier to argue for, under the umbrella.

    That is fine insofar as it goes. Reducing toxic waste, stopping deforestation, planting trees, and so on are admirable goals for all humans to work toward. But rolling back the industrial revolution (with concomitant loss of food production, infrastructure, and modern amenities) to cut CO2 and canceling beef eating to reduce cow farts just aren't worthy of Christ's church.
     
  6. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    2,041
    Likes Received:
    2,278
    Country:
    Australia
    Religion:
    Anglican
     
  7. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    3,501
    Likes Received:
    1,791
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Anglican Christian
    I'll be away from computer for a couple days, but wanted to make a quick response.

    Yes, plastic is a problem. We should switch back to glass which is totally recyclable, and it would be far better than plastic which loses strength with just one or two re-uses and is thus limited in long-term recycleability.
     
  8. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    3,501
    Likes Received:
    1,791
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Anglican Christian
    Back again. I have a question for @Botolph : since "climate" has to do with the average course of weather conditions for a region (or more) of the planet, do discarded plastics have any appreciable effect upon climate? Can the plastics change temperatures or rainfall in a region?
     
  9. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    2,041
    Likes Received:
    2,278
    Country:
    Australia
    Religion:
    Anglican
    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/plastic-pollution

    Given that the production of plastics results in a significant release of CO2 into the atmosphere, it is a contributor, along with all manner of other activities. Plastic waste in the ocean has been seen as a contributor to a number of maritime issues, and I am very aware that rising sea temperatures in the Pacific have an impact on the La Nina effect, and we in Australia are entering our third consecutive La Nina in a row, so we expect to read about further flooding in the coming months.

    I am not a scientist, and I am not on a green bandwagon, however, on balance I suspect the answer to your question is in the affirmative. My issue is simply that I think we, the human race, should [refer to be part of the solution rather than part of the problem.
     
  10. Clayton

    Clayton Active Member

    Posts:
    151
    Likes Received:
    95
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Catholic
    I have a hard time taking climate activists seriously. They want zero emissions and electric cars for all while simultaneously trying to kill nuclear power, the one possible source for all that carbon-free juice.

    Their alarmism might be more creditably received if they had a coherent plan beyond wind and solar, but they don’t.
     
    Rexlion and Shane R like this.
  11. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    3,501
    Likes Received:
    1,791
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Anglican Christian
    If they were serious about eliminating fossil fuel use, they'd push the upscaling and building of thorium reactors. Thorium has many advantages compared to uranium. From what I've read, thorium isn't subject to meltdowns, it can't be used for weaponry, its waste is a tiny fraction compared to uranium waste products, and it's a safer material for workers to be around.

    But no, they simply push solar and wind generation, both of which are intermittent and somewhat unpredictable.
     
    Clayton likes this.