Working through Advent with Thomas Cranmer and St. Benedict

Discussion in 'Liturgy, and Book of Common Prayer' started by Invictus, Nov 28, 2021.

  1. Invictus

    Invictus Well-Known Member

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    First Sunday of Advent - Collects, Epistle, and Gospel

    Latin Collect:

    Stir up, O Lord, we pray thee, thy strength, and come among us, that whereas through our sins and wickedness we do justly apprehend thy wrathful judgments hanging over us, thy bountiful grace and mercy may speedily help and deliver us; Who livest and reignest with God the Father in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God, world without end. Amen.

    BCP Collect (1662):
    Almighty God, give us grace that we may cast away the works of darkness, and put upon us the armour of light, now in the time of this mortal life in which thy Son Jesus Christ came to visit us in great humility; that in the last day, when he shall come again in his glorious majesty to judge both the quick and the dead, we may rise to the life immortal; through him who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Ghost, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

    The Epistle. Rom. 13, 8.
    Owe no man any thing, but to love one another: for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law. For this, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not kill, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness, Thou shalt not covet; and if there be any other commandment, it is briefly comprehended in this saying, namely, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love is the fulfilling of the law. And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep: for now is our salvation nearer than when we believed. The night is far spent, the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armour of light. Let us walk honestly, as in the day; not in rioting and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and envying. But put ye on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make not provision for the flesh, to fulfil the lusts thereof.

    The Gospel. St. Matth. 21. 1.
    When they drew nigh unto Jerusalem, and were come to Bethphage, unto the mount of Olives, then sent Jesus two disciples, Saying unto them, Go into the village over against you, and straightway ye shall find an ass tied, and a colt with her: loose them, and bring them unto me. And if any man say ought unto you, ye shall say, The Lord hath need of them; and straightway he will send them. All this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, saying, Tell ye the daughter of Sion, Behold, thy King cometh unto thee, meek, and sitting upon an ass, and a colt the foal of an ass. And the disciples went, and did as Jesus commanded them, And brought the ass, and the colt, and put on them their clothes, and they set him thereon. And a very great multitude spread their garments in the way; others cut down branches from the trees, and strawed them in the way. And the multitudes that went before, and that followed, cried, saying, Hosanna to the son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest. And when he was come into Jerusalem, all the city was moved, saying, Who is this? And the multitude said, This is Jesus the prophet of Nazareth of Galilee. And Jesus went into the temple of God, and cast out all them that sold and bought in the temple, and overthrew the tables of the moneychangers, and the seats of them that sold doves, And said unto them, It is written, My house shall be called the house of prayer; but ye have made it a den of thieves.
     
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  2. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

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    The ACNA had the same collect, but with Zech. 14:1-9; Psalm 50; 1 Thess. 3:6-13; and Luke 21:25-33.
     
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  3. Invictus

    Invictus Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. This can easily be checked, of course, but if my memory is correct, the 1928 APB retained the 1662 Collects. I’m assuming the 2019 ACNA BCP did so as well, but retained the Epistle and Gospel cycle from the 1979 3-year cycle. The OT reading and Psalm are different from the 1979, from what I can tell.

    In the old system, each Eucharist had an assigned Epistle and Gospel reading (but nothing from the OT). Portions of the Epistle were then used as the “Little Chapter” at Lauds (first light), Terce (3rd Hour/9:00 AM), Sext (6th Hour/12:00 PM), None (9th Hour/3:00 PM), and Vespers (sunset). A portion of the Gospel reading is often - but not always - the Antiphon for the Benedictus and the Magnificat at Lauds and Vespers, respectively. For today, the Little Chapter sequence in the (Monastic) Divine Office is as follows:
    • Lauds: Romans 13:11
    • Terce: Romans 13:11
    • Sext: Romans 13:12-13
    • None: Romans 13:13-14
    • Vespers: Romans 13:11
    So if one utilizes the Monastic canonical hours and attends either a 1662 Anglican or Extraordinary Form (1962) RC parish, one would have both spoken/sung and heard the Epistle, Gospel, and Collect (which is used in all the hours except Prime and Compline) in part or in their entirety up to 6 times throughout the day. That is quite the reinforcement!
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2021
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  4. Invictus

    Invictus Well-Known Member

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    Second Sunday of Advent - Collects, Epistle, and Gospel

    Latin Collect:

    Stir up our hearts, O Lord, to make ready the ways of thine Only-begotten Son, that by His coming our minds being purified, we may the more worthily give up ourselves to thy service: Who with thee liveth and reigneth, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God, world without end. Amen.

    BCP Collect (1662):
    Blessed Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning; Grant that we may in such wise hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them, that by patience and comfort of thy holy Word, we may embrace, and ever hold fast, the blessed hope of everlasting life, which thou hast given us in our Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen.
    The Collect from the First Sunday in Advent is to be repeated every day, with the other Collects in Advent, until Christmas-Eve.

    The Epistle. Rom. 15. 4.
    Whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope. Now the God of patience and consolation grant you to be likeminded one toward another according to Christ Jesus: That ye may with one mind and one mouth glorify God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. Wherefore receive ye one another, as Christ also received us to the glory of God. Now I say that Jesus Christ was a minister of the circumcision for the truth of God, to confirm the promises made unto the fathers: And that the Gentiles might glorify God for his mercy; as it is written, For this cause I will confess to thee among the Gentiles, and sing unto thy name. And again he saith, Rejoice, ye Gentiles, with his people. And again, Praise the Lord, all ye Gentiles; and laud him, all ye people. And again, Esaias saith, There shall be a root of Jesse, and he that shall rise to reign over the Gentiles; in him shall the Gentiles trust. Now the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that ye may abound in hope, through the power of the Holy Ghost.

    The Gospel. St. Luke 21.25.
    And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring; Men's hearts failing them for fear, and for looking after those things which are coming on the earth: for the powers of heaven shall be shaken. And then shall they see the Son of man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. And when these things begin to come to pass, then look up, and lift up your heads; for your redemption draweth nigh. And he spake to them a parable; Behold the fig tree, and all the trees; When they now shoot forth, ye see and know of your own selves that summer is now nigh at hand. So likewise ye, when ye see these things come to pass, know ye that the kingdom of God is nigh at hand. Verily I say unto you, This generation shall not pass away, till all be fulfilled. Heaven and earth shall pass away: but my words shall not pass away.
     
  5. Invictus

    Invictus Well-Known Member

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    Bearing in mind that Advent is literally the season of the Coming of Christ to his people - and that there are (at least) two of these - note the ‘canonical effect’ (cf. Christopher Seitz) of the two Gospel readings we’ve met so far. The first describes, not the Lord’s birth in Bethlehem, but his kingly entry into Jerusalem and his implicit assertion of personal sovereignty over the Temple, in line with the prerogatives of the Davidic monarchs.* The second Gospel reading describes Jesus’ return in glory, and the terrifying signs which will accompany it. Accordingly, the old Latin Collect for the first Sunday appears to have more the first than the second advent in view, while the Latin Collect for the second Sunday seems to be referring more to the second Advent than the first. (Also, note their relative brevity, in comparison to the BCP Collects.) The BCP Collect for the first Sunday is quite unambiguous in referring to both Advents, while the Collect for the second Sunday in effect tells us what will enable us (the Church) to persevere from the first Advent to the second: the Word of God. The rubrics also direct that the Collect for the first Sunday, which states so eloquently the themes of the season, continue to be read every day until Christmas Eve.

    *The biblical pattern is that the secular (i.e., non-priestly) ruler is the one ultimately responsible for the purity of worship and the places of worship within his/her realm, which the priestly order is then tasked with maintaining. The ruler, not some super-priest, is the one who has ultimate temporal jurisdiction over those matters. That is the historic Anglican, Byzantine, and Russian position.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2021
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  6. Othniel

    Othniel Active Member Typist

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    I love this tidbit.
     
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