Which Lectionary do you use for the Daily Office?

Discussion in 'Liturgy, and Book of Common Prayer' started by Sean611, Aug 2, 2012.

  1. Sean611

    Sean611 Well-Known Member

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    I was just curious as to which lectionary is being read (and why you like it) by my fellow Anglicans around the Communion for the Daily Office:

    Here are some popular choices:

    1662 BCP (Church of England)
    -The 30-Day Psalter (this is what I use, I like reading through the Psalms every month)
    -1871 Lectionary
    -1922 Alternate Lectionary

    1928 BCP (Episcopal Church USA)
    -The 30-Day Psalter
    -1928 Lectionary
    -1945 Revised Lectionary

    1979 BCP (Episcopal Church USA)
    -1979 Lectionary
    -Revised Common Lectionary (I have been using this one for the lessons, but with 30-Day Psalter)


    Choices i'm less familiar with:

    1962 BCP (Anglican Church of Canada)
    -Psalter?
    -1962 Lectionary?

    Does Anglican Church of Australia use the 1662 BCP?

    Please feel free to correct any mistakes I may have made or to offer your BCP and lectionary if i've left it off. Thanks for participating!!
     
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  2. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Placeholder, for more posting later...

    Just let me say now that I do not recommend the 1962 Canadian Psalter. Psalm 58 is absent entirely, and many verses are removed from other psalms with the verses renumbered. These are all verses asking God to punish, damn, or destroy enemies.

    Example: Psalm 68 omits verses 21-23, and renumbers 24 as 21 and so on. :(
     
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  3. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    I use Rite I of the 1979 BCP, with the 1928 Psalter (which is perfectly okay in the rubrics!) with the 1662 Lectionary, I'm using that for the 350th of that book but I do like it, it's so easy to use.

    Does the 1928 Psalter edit like the 1962?
     
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  4. Sean611

    Sean611 Well-Known Member

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    That's a cool thing to do to celebrate 350 years of the 1662 BCP! How do you use the lectionary in the 1662 BCP? After using the 1979 BCP Revised Common Lectionary for so long, i'm a bit confused by it.
     
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  5. Scottish Monk

    Scottish Monk Well-Known Member

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    For the reading of the Psalms, Canticles, and prayers, I use the Divine Office, which is an English translation (Rev. Ed., Collins, UK) of the Roman Catholic Liturgy of the Hours, and can be found at Universalis.com. The print edition consists of 3 volumes and can be found here.

    I do not follow any prescribed Lectionary; instead, I read the Bible through in three paths: Old Testament, New Testament, and Gospels. Similar to what a Lectionary does, however, I read the Scripture at my own pace--sometimes stopping along the way to study the Hebrew or Greek words, study the places in a Bible atlas or geographic reference, and reading some commentary such as the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Background Commentary Old Testament and New Testament. I also read the notes in my favorite Study Bibles.

    Yes, I miss out on reading scripture in step with the church calendar, however, I do read through the Bible (usually every 5 years) and get to study along the way. I do have to be careful, however, because sometimes the study of Scripture (man's word) gets in the way of reading Scripture (God's Word).

    I read the Psalms through every four weeks, as outlined in The Divine Office.

    ...Scottish Monk
     
  6. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    I echo Scottish Monk. What was the reasoning for changing 1662's lectionary in 1871? Surely the meaning of the words in the lessons hadn't changed in 200 years.
     
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  7. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    It's unbelievably easy. It's based off the civil calendar (not the liturgical). So here's the link for August: http://www.eskimo.com/~lhowell/bcp1662/info/cal_1662/august.html. So since today is the 2nd, you read Jeremiah 31 and John 21 for MP and Jeremiah 32 and Hebrews 5 for EP.

     
  8. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    To shorten the lessons. The 1662 gives a full chapter (or two) for each lesson at each office, so you will read four chapters minimum per day. The 1871 lectionary still follows the civil calendar but shortens the lections to about half a chapter.

     
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  9. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    In fact, from 1662 to 1871, English (and American) churchgoers got a healthy diet of Scripture at Church on Sundays: 1) the Psalms, read monthly; 2) two chapters at Morning Prayer; 3) the Epistle; 4) the Gospel.
     
  10. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Thank you for the clarification on civil vs. liturgical calendar, Hackney. :)

    So even in America they would have Mattins, the Litany, and at least Ante-Communion every Sunday? What a waterfall of Scripture!
     
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  11. Scottish Monk

    Scottish Monk Well-Known Member

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    Any thoughts on why the BCP Lectionary changed from one edition to the next?

    ...Scottish Monk
     
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  12. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    Until 1892, when Mattins, the Litany, and Ante-Communion were regarded as separate services.
     
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  13. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

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    which BCPs?
     
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  14. Scottish Monk

    Scottish Monk Well-Known Member

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    I must have gotten my posts out of sync. Anyway, I think you already answered my question.

    ...Scottish Monk
     
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  15. Gordon

    Gordon Well-Known Member

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  16. Moses

    Moses Member

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    For the daily office, I've used both the 1928 American lectionary and the 1943 edition. Here are my thoughts:

    - The 1943 lectionary is better about choosing matching OT and NT readings around a common theme. It also has Isiah read in Advent, which seems better suited to the season than the 1928's choice of Genesis.

    - The 1943 lectionary is more prone to skipping over controversial passages. It also has you bounce around the verses in an odd manner; like Matt 13:24-30, 36-43 one day, and Matt. 13:31-35, 44-52 the next. It also gives multiple options for Sundays. The 1928 is much more straightforward; the readings take a bit longer but there's no headache skipping from verse to verse or having to choose your own readings.

    - I like that 1943 Psalm schedule puts psalms at more appropriate times (Psalm 4 at Evening prayer, for example), but it takes twice as long to get through the Psalter, and the angry parts get censored. I know WW2 was happening and people probably didn't want to say violent things at church, but I struggle to understand making that the official norm.

    - The 1928 readings for feasts sometimes make a lot more sense to me, an uneducated layperson. The readings for today, the feast of St. Luke, are a good example of this.

    There's a book, The American Lectionary by Bayard Jones, that explains the changes, but I haven't managed to get my hands on a copy.
     
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  17. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Well-Known Member

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    I do the 1662 readings.
     
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  18. Dave Kemp

    Dave Kemp Member Anglican

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    Me too.
     
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  19. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

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    FYI, if anyone's interested, Deus Publications is having a Black Friday sale on the 1928 BCP. (I have no interest in or affiliation with the publisher.) They offer free shipping, at least in the continental US (not sure about elsewhere).
    https://deusbooks.org/
     
  20. Moses

    Moses Member

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    Finally read this since LA press put up a pdf version on their site. Rev. Jones seemed to take it as axiomatic that a bunch of the psalms are inappropriate for Christian prayer. I'm inclined to think better catechesis is the solution rather than selectivity in our liturgical scripture reading.

    The book made me a great deal less inclined to use the 1943 lectionary.