Where is this from?

Discussion in 'Questions?' started by Brigid, Dec 1, 2019.

  1. Brigid

    Brigid Active Member Anglican

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    I was wondering. Where does - see Christ/Jesus in all you meet - come from? Scripture? A saint? :hmm:
     
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  2. Will_

    Will_ Member

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    The most recent happenstance of this idea that I know of is Mother Teresa of Calcutta, who is quoted as saying: "I see Jesus in every human being. I say to myself, this is hungry Jesus, I must feed him. This is sick Jesus. This one has leprosy or gangrene; I must wash him and tend to him. I serve becuase I love Jesus."

    Scripturally it probably stems from Matthew 25:40-45... at least that's how I see that passage.
     
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  3. AnglicanAgnostic

    AnglicanAgnostic Active Member

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    Maybe you all have the wrong meaning for "meet"in this context.


    c. 1300, mēte, "having the right shape or size," from Old English gemæte, Anglian *gemete, "suitable, having the same dimensions," from Proto-Germanic *ga-mætijaz (source also of Old Norse mætr, Old High German gimagi, German gemäß "suitable"), from collective prefix *ga- + PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." The formation is the same as that of commensurate. Meaning "proper, appropriate" is from early 14c.; that of "fit (to do something)" is from late 14c.

    As in " It is meet and right so to do."
    Perhaps you Anglicans need to brush up on your Sursum Corda in the B.o.C.P. :D
     
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  4. Brigid

    Brigid Active Member Anglican

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    Mother Teresa is/was great! A really holy woman. I wish I was that good.

    Yes, I certainly see it in Matt 25:40-45.
     
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  5. Tiffy

    Tiffy Well-Known Member

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    Christ in Friend and stranger? (St Patrick's Breastplate).
     
  6. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Not me. There is a hymn in the Byzantine form of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom (CHR) called “It is Truly Meet”, which is in praise of the Theotokos. In the Byzantine form of the Divine Liturgy of St. Basil (ByzBAS), it is replaced by “All of creation,” which is also in praise of the Theotokos. But sometimes these hymns are replaced by entirely different hymns. They are Megalynarions, rather than Theotokions, a type of hymn from the Divine Office which is always in praise of the Theotokos. Also, it appears in the Anaphora in roughly the same place as in the BCP Anaphora, in both ByzBAS and CHR.

    Actually, the choir singing All of Creation instead of It is Truly Meet is, in most Eastern Orthodox and Greek Catholic churches, the most clear indication that one is listening to or attending the ByzBAS rather than CHR. Which can happen unexpectedly due to quirks in the Typikon; in 2016, Christmas on the “New Calendar” fell on a day causing ByzBAS to be used instead of CHR; normally ByzBAS is used on the eves of feasts at a Vesperal Divine Liturgy, and otherwise only in Lent, except on January 1st, which is the feast of both St. Basil and the Circumcision.

    Note, I did not invent this liturgical shorthand; it is standard in most liturgical commentaries. I might well post a reference to it if we wind up talking about ancient Eastern liturgical texts frequently enough (which would slightly annoy me, because I do love the Eastern rites, and there are places on the Net where I go to talk about them, wjereas here I indulge my love for the Church of England and her provinces around the world, and the Continuing Anglican movement). :)

    Suffice it to say, however, I have spent so much time studying the liturgy, one of the great loves of my life and something that reminded me of the importance of my faith, that when I read “meet”, the feeling of “right, virtuous, correct, and proper” enters into my head, rather than the feeling of meeting people. Meeting always becomes a verb now for me, with meet as an adjective. ;)
     
  7. PDL

    PDL Active Member Anglican

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    I strongly disagree. People do not seem to know much about her. She was canonised by Pope John Paul II and he canonised more saints than any other pope. I cannot help but see his actions (so many canonisations) as a publicity stunt for Roman Catholicism.

    Mother Teresa admitted she did not believe. She was praised for going to dictators and asking them for money. Where did that money come from originally? It was stolen from the poor. She is praised for her work with the poor. Look into what she really did. She kept the poor in their place and gave them no aspirations or assistance to improve their lot. Her nurses did not even bother with basic hygiene methods. I have seen nurses who volunteered from the UK to spend time in India in Mother Teresa's institutions report on the very poor standards of nursing. Needles and syringes were re-used after simply being rinsed with cold water.

    I am afraid that Mother Teresa is not worthy of the praise she receives. However, the Mother Teresa money making and promotion machine is too big for a few lone voices to tackle. The myth about her is ingrained too much in popular culture.
     

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