What makes up an Anglican Service?

Discussion in 'Liturgy, and Book of Common Prayer' started by BrethrenBoy, May 30, 2013.

  1. BrethrenBoy

    BrethrenBoy Member

    Posts:
    92
    Likes Received:
    48
    Country:
    The United States
    Religion:
    Anabaptist
    I started a role play online with some author friends who want to collaborate on a story. It's set in modern day New York City, and to try and add some variety I decided to make one of my characters an Episcopal priest. We're at a point now where several characters plan of visiting the priest's church; however, I've never been to an Anglican Church so I don't know how the service should happen. Where would be soon good resources for how to write this sceen.
     
  2. Peteprint

    Peteprint Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    724
    Likes Received:
    719
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    High-Church Laudian
    I would suggest you attend a service. That way you would have first hand experience. :)
     
    Servos likes this.
  3. BrethrenBoy

    BrethrenBoy Member

    Posts:
    92
    Likes Received:
    48
    Country:
    The United States
    Religion:
    Anabaptist
    I'd love too, but I don't have my driver's license yet, and I don't think my family will want to go to a strange church so I can write a few posts online. :)
     
    Peteprint likes this.
  4. Peteprint

    Peteprint Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    724
    Likes Received:
    719
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    High-Church Laudian
    Perhaps you can locate some examples of Anglican services on YouTube? I am certain they have them.
     
    Servos likes this.
  5. seeking.IAM

    seeking.IAM Member

    Posts:
    96
    Likes Received:
    89
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Episcopalian
    Really, we are not so "strange." :)

    Any role play about the Anglican Church must include pew aerobics.
     
    Lorrie S and Lux Christi like this.
  6. Symphorian

    Symphorian Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    351
    Likes Received:
    519
    Country:
    UK
    Religion:
    Anglican, CofE
    A good suggestion and there are some full length services.

    Service of Holy Communion:

    In a Low Church/Evangelical setting the minister wouldn't wear Eucharistic vestments. The Holy Table is unlikely to have coloured frontals and is often a simple wooden table without lighted candles upon it.
    In a High Church/Anglo Catholic setting the Priest would wear Eucharistic vestments. The Altar, made of stone or wood is often ornate and furnished with coloured frontals and will have at least two lighted candles upon it.

    The service often starts with a hymn and may be followed by the Invocation of the Holy Trinity. (In the name of the Father, and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. Amen). The Priest will greet the people and may say a few words introducing the theme of the day.
    Prayers of Penitence follow with a general confession said by all. The absolution is pronounced by the Priest.
    The Gloria in Excelsis (Glory to God in the highest) is said/sung by all, but not usually in the seasons of Advent or Lent.
    The Priest says the Collect of the day. (A short prayer which varies each Sunday).
    The Liturgy of the Word follows with readings from the OT, NT (Epistle) and most importantly the Gospel. There may be just 2 readings, but there is always a Gospel reading, The readings may be given by members of the congregation but the Gospel is usually read by the Priest/Deacon. A Psalm may be said/sung between the OT and NT (Epistle) reading and a hymn is often sung before the reading of the Gospel.
    The sermon is given by the Priest, another member of clergy or sometimes a guest preacher.
    All say the Nicene Creed.
    Intercessions are offered and may be led by members of the congregation.
    The peace is given by the Priest and all may exchange a sign of peace such as a hand shake.
    The Altar/Holy Table is prepared during which a hymn may be sung.
    The Eucharistic Prayer follows during which the Sanctus is said/sung. (Holy, holy, holy Lord, God of power and might...) The Eucharistic Prayer will include the Words of Institution/Consecration 'Take, eat; this is my Body which is given for you/Drink this, all of you; this is my Blood of the new covenant......do this in remembrance of me.'
    The Lord's Prayer is said by all.
    The Agnus Dei (Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the world...) may be said or sung by all but not usually in Low/Evangelical churches).
    All may say a prayer in preparation before receiving Communion.
    Communion is administered during which a hymn or anthem may be sung.
    All say a prayer of thanksgiving after Communion.
    The Priest gives the Blessing and the congregation are dismissed.
    A final hymn may be sung.
     
    feverforever and Lux Christi like this.
  7. Lux Christi

    Lux Christi Active Member

    Posts:
    118
    Likes Received:
    99
    Country:
    Canada
    Religion:
    Anglican (Anglo-Catholic)
    Wow, I think Symphorian had it most to a pat! I go to an Anglican High Mass, and we generally say our Confession and Abdolution after the Liturgy of the Word, and before the Eucharistic prayer and Consecration. We also sing an anthem to Mary (the Angelus prayer or the Regina Coeli) after the Blessing and Dismissal.

    I think watching an Anglican service on Youtube may be the best. High Mass can be heady to wrap the mind around!
     
    Lorrie S likes this.
  8. historyb

    historyb Active Member

    Posts:
    243
    Likes Received:
    199
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    CEC (Anglo-Catholic)


    Here is an Anglican High Mass :)
     
    Lorrie S and BrethrenBoy like this.
  9. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    536
    Likes Received:
    386
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    The Episcopal Church
    NYC has a good mixture of Episcopal parishes, from nosebleed high, Resurrection, to Prayer Book Catholic, St. Thomas, broad/liberal catholic, St. Bart's, the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, to Evangelical, Calvary/St. George's, Grace, etc.

    For a fictional purpose, you could either pick a type of Churchman you were thinking of and study that tradition or go for a MOTR Episcopal style.
     
    Lorrie S likes this.
  10. BrethrenBoy

    BrethrenBoy Member

    Posts:
    92
    Likes Received:
    48
    Country:
    The United States
    Religion:
    Anabaptist
    Thank you all for the information. I'll really need to look into it, and hope to visit a few different styles of Anglican services one day. What does MOTR mean?
     
  11. The Hackney Hub

    The Hackney Hub Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    536
    Likes Received:
    386
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    The Episcopal Church
    MOTR = middle of the road
     
  12. Lorrie S

    Lorrie S Member

    Posts:
    35
    Likes Received:
    9
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    None
    Thanks for the explanations. I had no idea there were so many different Episcopal parishes. I do have an Anglican Church about 20 minutes away. I am too liberal and after fighting with Catholics for 2 years, I am going toward the Episcopal Church but I sure will attend so I can see worship at that parish. Thanks for all the explanations. I can see I need to do a lot of reading.
     
  13. Mockingbird

    Mockingbird Member

    Posts:
    77
    Likes Received:
    28
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Anglican
    For Lorrie S's information, here is the Episcopal Church in Michigan:

    Diocese of Michigan: http://www.episcopalchurch.org/diocese/michigan

    Diocese of Western Michigan: http://www.episcopalchurch.org/diocese/western-michigan

    Diocese of Northern Michigan: http://www.episcopalchurch.org/diocese/northern-michigan

    Diocese of Eastern Michigan: http://www.episcopalchurch.org/diocese/eastern-michigan


    For Brethren Boy, here is the Diocese of New York, which includes Manhattan: http://www.episcopalchurch.org/diocese/new-york