What Bible do Anglicans use? Is the New American Bible and New International Version acceptable?

Discussion in 'The Commons' started by DarthJupiter, Sep 16, 2018.

  1. DarthJupiter

    DarthJupiter New Member

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    Growing up Roman Catholic in the USA, I typically used the New American Bible. Recently I bought the New International Version Bible for my android phone.

    Are either acceptable? What translation does the Anglican Communion-especially the Church of England-use?
     
  2. BibleHoarder

    BibleHoarder Active Member

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    Besides the King James, Anglicans have no official bible. I am a bible nut so I can tell you quite a few things about bibles.

    Secondly, the Anglican Communion doesn't prohibit its churches or members from choosing to read a translation they like for private study. Many of the 'officially approved' bibles stated on the websites of the Anglican Communion and its affiliates are confirmed for use in public teaching in that they meet certain criteria, but its up to the church leaders to decide which among them they want to use. If I recall, the original New American Bible and its Revised Edition are among those approved by the AC, so if you are already well acquainted with them, keep on reading. I recently got the original NAB for my collection and it's not too shabby. The NIV was enormously helpful in its day, but, despite being the no. 1 selling bible even now, there are some problems with it, and I feel that it has run its course. The original 1984 NIV had its problems, but the newer 2011 revision has even more. Both retain the embarrassing 'rape' mistranslation in Deuteronomy 22:28.

    I use the New King James Version as my preferred bible in print, as it keeps the KJV tradition but updates the archaic words. Also, for a good digital bible, I'd recommend the WEB/World English Bible (which has the deuterocanon). It is a modern, public-domain bible that is very accurate and can be downloaded for free in formats like ePub and Mobi, among others. The creators wanted to make a free, no-copyright e-Bible that was meticulously translated.
     
  3. Symphorian

    Symphorian Well-Known Member

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    The Church of England doesn't authorise particular translations of the Bible - rather, it sets criteria by which versions of Scripture are judged suitable for reading in church during public worship. These criteria include:

    Faithfulness in translating the Hebrew or Greek
    Resonance with the language of prayer used in the particular authorised service
    Suitability for reading aloud in a public gathering
    Use of familiar language in well-known quotations or figures of speech
    Familiarity to the listener
    Intelligibility to the listener
    Appropriateness to the linguistic register of the particular congregation

    Versions which are read in church during the course of public worship should be translations of the Bible, not paraphrases of it. (In less formal contexts, paraphrases may be used.)

    Versions which satisfy many of the above criteria include:
    Authorised Version/King James AV/KJB
    Revised Standard Version RSV
    New International Version NIV
    New Jerusalem Bible NJB
    New Revised Standard Version NRSV
    Revised English Bible REB
    English Standard Version ESV

    The Apocrypha/Deuterocanon is a necessary resource in CofE lectionaries. Decisions about which version of the Bible to use are made locally.

    At my parish church we mostly use the NRSV. Exceptions are made for services like Nine Lessons & Carols or BCP services when we use the KJB.
     
  4. BibleHoarder

    BibleHoarder Active Member

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    Can you explain why the NKJV is not on the approved list? I know Anglicans who use the NKJV so it is certainly not condemned, but I wanted to know why it is not among the bibles listed for meeting the criteria.

    And BTW, the World English Bible is a revision of the ASV (American Standard Version) which itself is a revision of the KJV.
     
  5. Symphorian

    Symphorian Well-Known Member

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    I don't have an answer to your question. The above list comes from a Note by the House of Bishops in 2002.

    Curiously, supplementary material to the current Canons of the Cof E has the following to say with regard to versions of the Bible:

    "If The Book of Common Prayer simply prescribes a portion of scripture to be used, but does not set it out (e.g. in the tables of lessons), any version of the Bible which has not been prohibited by lawful authority may be used.

    So far as Common Worship services are concerned, while the lectionary is based on the New Revised Standard Version, any version of the Bible which has not been prohibited by lawful authority may again be used.

    Currently, no version of the Bible has been prohibited by lawful authority."
     

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