What are you reading?

Discussion in 'Arts, Literature, and Games' started by Scottish Monk, May 25, 2012.

  1. Scottish Monk

    Scottish Monk Well-Known Member

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    Barbee, C. Frederick, & Zahl, Paul F. M. (eds.). (1999). The Collects of Thomas Cranmer: Published in the 450th Anniversary of The Book of Common Prayer. [119 pages.]. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans.

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    Contents
    Foreword by editors​
    Introduction by C. FitzSimons Allison, XII Bishop of South Carolina​
    Notes to the Reader by the editors​
    Collects​

    Barbee and Zahl gives us the opportunity to step back in time and study the early collects of Christianity before the 1662 BCP. The entries follow the pre-1979 BCP church year calendar. Today's entry can be found as "The Eleventh Sunday After Trinity" (instead of the 1979 label "The Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost, Proper 15"). After each collect, the editors give us a short history of the collect (i.e., whether the collect was original with Cranmer, or a Cranmer translation from the pre-reformation Sacramentaries of Leo I (440-461), Gelasius (492-496), and Gregory the Great (590-604). The editors also give us a meditation upon the theme of the original collect. What is most interesting about this publication is the identification of the changes introduced in the collects with the 1662 BCP, and, of course, the 1979 BCP.

    Here is the collect for The Eleventh Sunday after Trinity as translated by Thomas Cranmer and a short history.

    The Collect
    God, which declarest thy almighty power, most chiefly in showing mercy and pity; Give unto us abundantly thy grace, that we, running to thy promises, may be made partakers of thy heavenly treasures; through Jesus Christ our Lord.​

    History
    Thomas Cranmer's faithful translation of this Gelasian Collect was drastically altered by the revisers of 1662. Adding the phrase "that we, running the way of thy commandments, may obtain thy gracious promises . . . " makes the "heavenly treasures" ones which we can earn by obedience (the Law) rather than the true gift of God.​

    The Collect is closely linked to the Gospel for this day (St. Luke 18:9-14), the Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican, in which we see God's willingness to show mercy when He is approached with penitence and humility.​

    ...Scottish Monk
     
  2. Scottish Knight

    Scottish Knight Well-Known Member

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    Just started the book "The rare jewel of christian contentment" by Jeremiah Burroughs (1648)

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    Hope I will find lots of practical help in this book.
     
  3. Gordon

    Gordon Well-Known Member

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    There are some extremely relevant insights about our history int he first chapter of this book and it probably worth a read by everyone here:

    Breathing Under Water: Spirituality and the Twelve Steps by Richard Rohr...

    This guys is freaky every book of his I pick up of his resonates so deeply with me physically and spiritually.

    :p:D Yikes maybe it is because we are both Franciscans... :)
     
  4. Seeker

    Seeker Member

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    I am re-reading CS Lewis The Four Loves
     
  5. Gordon

    Gordon Well-Known Member

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    Must put that one on the list... by the way welcome about Seeker.
     
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  6. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    I'm reading the works of John Bramhall, legendary Anglican Divine:

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    C.S. Lewis is another great one, must get around to him some time.
     
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  7. Scottish Knight

    Scottish Knight Well-Known Member

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    Just started reading the sermons of Anthony of Padua
    http://www.basilica.org/pages/ebooks/St. Anthony of Padua-The Sermons of Saint Anthony.pdf

    I finished the sermon for Paul's conversion day

    There were a couple of passages that stood out for me:

    let us now hear about Benjamin, and how he was converted
    today from a ‘son of sorrow’ into a ‘son of the right hand’...
    Your right hand is your ‘outer’ hand. The right hand of the Almighty gave him [Saul] such a cuff, on his
    neck as hard as a rhinoceros’s, that he made him fall to the ground. A light from heaven shone
    round him at mid-day, brighter than the noon-day sun. So gentle and kind, the correction of that
    right hand! To strike with a scourge of light, to rebuke with a voice of gentleness"

    and

    Most wretched of all men are those religious who have left all things, yet have not followed
    Christ. A double evil will fall on them. All outward comfort is absent; no inward comfort is present; if worldly men lacked the latter, at least they would have outward things...
    We have followed thee: We run in the odour of thy ointments

    Reminded me how we all are like Benjamin, changed from a son of sorrow to a son of God's right hand and how reminded how everything we do is to follow Christ.

    Lokking forward to reading some more
     
  8. Sean611

    Sean611 Well-Known Member

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    For the last few weeks, i've been studying the Gospel of Mark. I've been using the following study bibles:

    oxford.jpg

    The New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocrypha, Augmented Third Edition, College Edition, New Revised Standard Version

    "Thousands of satisfied scholars, students, and worshippers have relied on the New Oxford Annotated Bible for its excellent scholarship, easy-to-use supplementary materials, and high-quality bindings.

    The newest edition of the NOAB with Apocrypha is no different, offering a wealth of new maps, charts and diagrams that expand on this already indispensible Bible. It includes all of the features that readers have valued in past editions and more: foot-of-page annotations provide convenient reference to unknown terms, while background essays, charts, and Oxford's signature biblical maps deepen the readers' understanding of the Biblical world in its historical, social, and geographical context.

    Printed on smooth, flexible paper in clear typeface, and available in a variety of elegant bindings, the NOAB offers the best features at reasonable values. The NOAB with Apocrypha combines Oxford's highest reputation in theological scholarship with sensitivity towards readers' needs in scriptural study."


    http://www.amazon.com/Annotated-Apo...61&sr=1-3&keywords=new+oxford+annotated+bible#_

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    The Orthodox Study Bible: New Testament and Psalms

    "For the first time, English-speaking Orthodox Christians have an edition of the New Testament and Psalms that offers Bible study aids written from the Orthodox perspective. Prepared under the direction of canonical Orthodox theologians and hierarchs, The Orthodox Study Bible presents a remarkable combination of historic theological insights and practical instruction in Christian living. Clergy and laity who want to learn more about the Orthodox Christian faith and liturgical and sacramental foundations in the Scriptures will gain a wealth of information for the preparation of sermons and lessons as Orthodox Christian doctrine is clearly explained.
    If you are looking for authoritative guidance in interpreting Scripture, understanding the early church, and learning how to apply the Word of God to your spiritual life -- The Orthodox Study Bible will be a treasured resource for you."
    http://www.amazon.com/Orthodox-Stud...48154533&sr=1-2&keywords=orthodox+study+bible
    Books on My list to Be Read Very Soon:
    Our Anglican Heritage: Can an Ancient Church Be a Church of the Future? Authors: Bishop John W. Howe and Rev. Sam c. pascoe
    http://www.amazon.com/Our-Anglican-...=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1348154989&sr=1-2
    "--What is Anglicanism and how is it distinctive?
    --Where did it come from and where is it ?
    --Which beliefs, values, and practices stand at the heart of this important, global Communion?
    --How can its rich heritage help it move into the future?

    This book is an essential guide to the Anglican tradition for anyone who has ever wondered what Anglicanism-the largest Protestant denomination in the world-is all about. Now fully updated and significantly revised, this second edition of Our Anglican Heritage gives voice to the strong and vibrant evangelical roots of Anglican Christianity.

    Events at the start of the twenty-first century have threatened to tear the Communion apart. The authors of this book, both Episcopal clergy, each responded to the crisis in different ways. One, a bishop, chose to stay in the Episcopal Church. The other chose to lead his congregation out of the Episcopal Church and into another Anglican Province. This book is a reflection of the strong faith and heritage they still share, and a recommitment to the biblical principles that still undergird and enliven Anglicanism.

    "I very much hope that all of you will read this excellent little book, Our Anglican Heritage. It is clear, it is forthright, it is well written, it is pungent, it is faithful, it is courageous."
    --Rev. John R.W. Stott
    Rector Emeritus, All Souls Anglican Church,

    "In a way one could say that Christ Church, Plano was built on the first edition of Our Anglican Heritage. Ever since I read it twenty-five years ago, it has been the staple that we recommend and give to all of our new members. In its new edition, the authors have done it again. They have given the church a clear and compelling account of what Anglicanism is, where it came from, and how it can be a trusted, magnificent, and reliable way of living out the Christian Faith."
    --The Rev. David H. Roseberry
    Rector, Christ Church in Plano, Texas

    "The publication of a new edition of Bishop Howe's Our Anglican Heritage is an event to be celebrated! Anglicanism can only be understood through its history, and here is a readable, fair, and concise account of that history. Clergy and laity alike should rejoice that this resource is available to them in a revised and updated form. Full marks to Bishop Howe and Dr. Pascoe for this excellent and much needed piece of work!"
    --The Very Rev. Philip Turner III
    Vice President of The Anglican Communion Institute
    former Dean of Berkley Divinity School at Yale

    The Right Reverend John Howe is the Episcopal Bishop of Central Florida. With his wife Karen he co-authored Which Way?: A Guide for Young Christians, along with numerous articles. He is the author of the first edition of Our Anglican Heritage (1976).

    The Reverend Dr. Sam Pascoe is an Anglican priest serving as resident clergy at Jacksonville Anglican Fellowship. He was an Episcopal priest for over twenty years, serving churches in Virginia and Florida. He left the American Episcopal Church in 2006 and is now a member of the Anglican Church in North America. He is the author of Buried Alive, a study of the Anglican Articles of Religion."
    The Oxford Movement: A Thematic History of the Tractarians and Their Times

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Oxford-Mo...id=1348155788&sr=8-1&keywords=oxford+movement

    "Well over a century and a half after its high point, the Oxford Movement continues to stand out as a powerful example of religion in action. Led by four young Oxford dons-John Henry Newman, John Keble, Richard Hurrell Froude, and Edward Pusey-this renewal movement within the Church of England was a central event in the political, religious, and social life of the early Victorian era. Beginning formally in 1833 with Keble's famous "National Apostasy" sermon and lasting until 1845, when Newman made his celebrated conversion to Roman Catholicism, the Oxford Movement posed deep and far-reaching questions about the relationship between Church and State, the Catholic heritage of the Church of England, and the Church's social responsibility, especially in the new industrial society. This book offers an up-to-date and highly accessible overview of the Oxford Movement. C. Brad Faught highlights five key areas in which the movement affected English society more broadly-politics, religion and theology, friendship, society, and missions. The advantage of this thematic approach is that it illuminates the frequently overlooked wider political, social, and cultural impact of the movement. The questions raised by the Tractarians remain as relevant today as they were then. Their most fundamental question-"What is the place of the Church in the modern world?"-still remains unanswered."
     
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  9. nkygreg

    nkygreg Member

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    The Irresistible Revolution (living as an ordinary radical) by Shane Claiborne
     
  10. historyb

    historyb Active Member

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    Dawn's light by Terry Blackstock. It's the fourth in a series that is about pluses that hit the earth and takes technology away and the main cast has to learn to rely on God much more than ever
     
  11. Aaytch Barton

    Aaytch Barton Active Member

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    My reading list currently includes
    • 1662 Book of Common Prayer (1x per year)
    • "Turning Points" by Mark Noll
    • "Sacred Fire" by Peter Lillback
    • "The Life of David Brainerd" by Jonathan Edwards
    • "Confessions" by St. Augustine, bishop of Hippo (1x per year)
    • "The Liturgy of Comprehension, 1689" by Timothy Fawcett
    • "Apologetic for the Great Awakening" by Jonathan Edwards
     
  12. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    If i may ask, why not the 1552 one? The 1662 one that is so glorious to us traditional Anglicans is the very same one that's according to you infested with Arminianism, Popery, and other such labels :)
     
  13. Aaytch Barton

    Aaytch Barton Active Member

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    Huh? The 1662 is almost identical to the 1552. You didn't realize that?
     
  14. historyb

    historyb Active Member

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    No problem :) This one in the series is a bit slow but sticking it out is always worth it I find
     
  15. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Yeah but 1662 was approved high in the 17th century, by all the great arminian Divines whom the Puritans called quasi-papists. At least with the 1552 BCP, you'd have no association with the 17th c. Divines.

    Don't get me wrong, personally I'm really glad that you're with the rest of us in the Anglican community in this one thing, but I'd think you'd have been against it...
     
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  16. Aaytch Barton

    Aaytch Barton Active Member

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    Correct. I would rather have no association with the 17th c. Divines. The purity and excellence of the 1662 BCP is due in no part to their effort. Combine it with Cranmer's 42 Articles (before they had a chance to alter them) and perhaps the Articles of 1595 which he surely would have endorsed, and then you really have something great. I refer you to the article I posted the other day pertaining to what might have happened had he not been martyred, which incidentally is written by probably the world's foremost authority on Cranmer. In a twist of irony, I mentioned it to a Presbyterian friend recently. He responded "What they meant for evil, God meant for good."
     
  17. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    So the 1552 isn't as pure and excellent then?
     
  18. Aaytch Barton

    Aaytch Barton Active Member

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    Huh? The 1552 is not in print and in fact I've never seen a complete text other than perhaps a faded image of one. Have you?
     
  19. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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  20. Aaytch Barton

    Aaytch Barton Active Member

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    Awesomely incomplete and unusable.