What about calendars in Europe marking Monday as the 1st day of the week

Discussion in 'Feasts, Fasts, and Church Calendar' started by rstrats, Apr 16, 2014.

  1. rstrats

    rstrats Member

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    In the United States, many Christians say that they observe Sunday, the first day of the week, at least in part, to commemorate the resurrection which they believe took place on the first day of the week. However, many areas of Europe use a calendar that has Sunday as the seventh day of the week. Does anyone know, in those areas that use that calendar, on what day they hold their weekly worship services? If they hold it on the seventh day, do they also do anything special on the first day in celebration of the resurrection?
     
  2. Mockingbird

    Mockingbird Member

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    Since very early the Jewish Sabbath has been identified with Saturday in the Roman seven-day planetary week. This make Sunday the first day of the Jewish week. For Christian purposes, the Jewish count applies, whatever others may use in other contexts.
     
  3. seagull

    seagull Active Member

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    We were always brought up to believe that Sunday was the first day of the week, and for me, for what it's worth, I suppose it still is. But certainly the secular calendar thinks otherwise: both my diary and the calendars it includes bear witness to that. And the BBC have (or at least had) a programme called "Start the Week": on a Monday. And Sunday is part of the weekend.
     
  4. rstrats

    rstrats Member

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    Someone new looking in may have the information requested in the OP.
     
  5. rstrats

    rstrats Member

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    Since it's been awhile, perhaps someone new visiting this topic may know.
     
  6. Tiffy

    Tiffy Active Member

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    I think most people, regardless of what day of the week someone else tells them is 'the first one', meet for worship on a Sunday, if Christian, on a Saturday, if Jewish and on a Friday, if Moslem. There are some exceptions, such as Seventh Day Adventists, who adopt the Jewish practice of worship on the Saturday for 'religious' reasons, but I know of nobody who worships on a Monday, mistakenly thinking it to be the day of resurrection, rather than it having been merely declared by a secular authority, the 'first day of the secular working week'.

    As to the thread question: If anyone is worshiping on Sunday, (what you call the 7th day), why would they worship as well on Monday, just because an atheist tells them it is the first day of the atheist week? It really would take an ignorant Christian to fall for the notion that 'resurrection day' can be 'moved' from Sunday to Monday, by an edict from a secular organization.

    However you may get some who will let you know whether they actually do do something 'special' on Monday as well. Let's wait and see.
     
  7. rstrats

    rstrats Member

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    Tiffy,
    re: "I think most people, regardless of what day of the week someone else tells them is 'the first one', meet for worship on a Sunday, if Christian..."


    So you're saying that Christians rest and worship on what ever day of the week is labeled "Sunday" regardless of the day of the week. Do you have any scripture for that practice?
     
  8. Tiffy

    Tiffy Active Member

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    No. Should I need some?

    I have no scripture for my practice of doing the shopping on Thursday, attending a football match on Saturday or eating Christmas pudding of the 25th Dec.

    Do you need scripture for your practices?
     
  9. rstrats

    rstrats Member

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    Tiffy,
    re: "No."

    OK, no problem. I was merely curious if any day labeled "Sunday" had some scriptural specialness to it.
     
  10. Tiffy

    Tiffy Active Member

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    Yes. "Sunday" was the day on which Jewish and Gentile Christians rose early in the morning to meet together, often in secret when under persecution, to greet the sunrise in commemoration of the risen Christ, who rose again to life, (according to the witnesses), on the day immediately following the Jewish Sabbath. Most Christians have held "The Lord's Day" as being special, in one way or another, ever since.

    I suppose the scriptural warrant for doing so, on that particular day would be the numerous scripture references stating that Jesus rose on the 3rd day, having died the day before The Jewish Sabbath. By coincidence the day name 'Sunday' happens also to be reflected in the Old English name for Sunday, Sunnandæg, meaning "day of the sun." Old English was the language of the Anglo-Saxons. In Germanic mythology the sun is personified as a goddess variously named Sunna or Sól (Sun in Old Norse). Coincidentally it turns out to be fortuitous for Christians because Jesus is also known as "The Light of The World". Hence "Sun-day" seems appropriate, even if it happens to appear to coincide with the day name of an ancient, non existent, pagan goddess.
     
  11. rstrats

    rstrats Member

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    Tiffy,
    re: "'Sunday' was the day on which Jewish and Gentile Christians rose early in the morning to meet together, often in secret when under persecution, to greet the sunrise in commemoration of the risen Christ...

    Just so it's understood that scripture is silent with regard to the practice. Nowhere does it say that anyone met on the first day of the week in commemoration/recognition of the resurrection.



    re: "Most Christians have held 'The Lord's Day' as being special, in one way or another, ever since."

    Just so it's understood, as stated above, that there is no scriptural instruction or practice given or shown for observing the first day of the week in honor of the resurrection. And likewise, just so it's understood that there is no scripture that ever refers to the first day of the week as "The Lord's Day".
     
  12. Tiffy

    Tiffy Active Member

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    Rev.1:9-11 ? I think that refers to the Lord's Day, don't you?

    "I was in the Spirit on the Lord's day, and I heard behind me a loud voice like a trumpet".

    So it was common practice when John wrote this. Everyone already knew what the Lord's Day was, otherwise no one would have known what he was referring to.

    Do we need a "scriptural instruction or practice given or shown for observing the first day of the week", then?

    We do it because Christians before us did it. Right back as far as anyone has memory or historical evidence of, and probably before. It is a tradition of The Church, which has been doing it for around nearly 2000 years.

    Get used to it. :laugh:

    As I said before, I need no scriptural warrant or command to regulate the day I decide to do the shopping or go to a football match. Why then should I need 'scripture' to tell me when to go to church or take a day off my daily labours or be specially grateful to Jesus for providing for our Salvation? 2 Cor.3:17.
     

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