The Best Study Bibles

Discussion in 'Sacred Scripture' started by Sean611, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. Sean611

    Sean611 Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    210
    Likes Received:
    222
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Lutheran (LCMS)
    I'm looking to purchase two study bibles very soon and i'm wondering which study bibles the members here recommend?

    The reason why I say two is because, in my eyes at least, it seems best to study using at least two different sources so a person gets more perspective than just one author's notes.

    Here are a few that i've heard recommended:

    1. New Oxford Annotated Bible w/ Apocrypha (2010)

    2. Oxford Study Bible: Revised English Bible w/ Apocrypha (1992)

    3. The Orthodox Study Bible (I realize it has an Eastern Orthodox slant, however, some Anglicans highly recommend this study bible)

    Thoughts on these and other recommendations? Thanks!! :D
     
  2. Gordon

    Gordon Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    689
    Likes Received:
    492
    Country:
    Australia
    Religion:
    Franciscan - Anglican
    Do you use the olive tree Bible reader. If you do there are a number of good study bibles available as well as different commentaries. The one our Theological College recommends is the Harper Collins Study Bible, it is available in book form and electronically. I use that and a number of others on my iPad, my iPhone, and on my iMac.

    http://www.olivetree.com

    The olive tree Bible reader does not have a lot apocryphal book versions but they have the main ones.
     
  3. Sean611

    Sean611 Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    210
    Likes Received:
    222
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Lutheran (LCMS)
    Thank you for your recommendation, i've heard of the Harper Collins Study Bible and will look into it. I will also look into the olive tree Bible reader, thanks!
     
  4. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    461
    Sean,
    I have The New Oxford Annotated Bible, NRSV, Augmented Third Edition, 2007. It is an Ecumenical Study Bible. However, it doesn't contian the Aposcrypha/Deuterocanonical Books. The 2010 with Apocrypha is probably better--though not sure.

    I do have a RSV, and a NRSV w/Apocrypha, but they are not study Bibles. (I still haven't gotten around to reading the Deuterocanonical Books. Need to put that on my to do list.)

    I have The Catholic Comparative New Testament. It has comparative translations of 8 Catholic Bible Versions. This is very helpful in N.T. studies and commentary comparisons.

    I have The TORAH: A Modern Commentary (JPS). The Jewish history and commentary is absolutely fascinating. The English translation is side-by-side with the Hebrew text (if I could only read Hebrew. . . .)

    I also have an English version of the TANAKH.

    I have The Dead Sea Scrolls Bible (English translation.) This is an important translation, especially when checking for variants.

    I have many other Bible Translations used primarily by Protestants (former Southern Baptist). I have an NIV Study Bible. The NIV certainly has it's flaws. However, since I like to compare commentaries; I keep this one on hand for its ample Protestant Commentary.

    I would actually like to buy an Orthodox Study Bible and a Catholic Study Bible.

    I absolutely agree that we need more than one perspective. I keep collecting. . . .

    Let me know what Study Bibles you purchase; and, of course, I would love to hear your reviews. :)

    Peace,
    Anna
     
    anglican74 and Sean611 like this.
  5. Sean611

    Sean611 Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    210
    Likes Received:
    222
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Lutheran (LCMS)
    Anna, thanks for your input!

    The Torah: A Modern Commentary sounds very fascinating, i'll have to look into that and the Catholic Comparative New Testament as well.

    I have an NIV Study Bible as well, it's a Zondervan Stuby Bible, I believe. It's from my Baptist days and I do still value it, despite the flaws.

    I don't have a Bible with the apocrypha yet, all I have are RSV, KJV, NIV, NKJV (New Testament), and The Message versions. I plan on getting an NRSV w/ apocrypha very soon. Do you have much experience with the Revised English Bible w/ apocrypha? I know it's on the Episcopal Church "approved" list.

    I've heard rumblings of a new Orthodox Study Bible coming out later this year. What intrigues me about the current Orthodox Study Bible is the fact that it provides notes and commentary from only a "slight" or "beginners" Orthodox perspective. They even go as far as to use the NKJV for the New Testament, a protestant translation. Some Orthdox priests and laity are not thrilled by it though, however, many others strongly endorse it. The one coming out at the end of the year is going to go much deeper than this one and will be using a different translation for the NT.
     
    Anna Scott likes this.
  6. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    461
    Sean,
    Great to hear back.

    The Torah: A Modern Commentary is truly fascinating, because the Jewish people view Scripture so differently. You might want to look through it in a store and then see what the best deals are online.

    Sounds like the same one I have; and it is good to have a good study Bible with commentaries from a Protestant perspective.

    The NRSV w/Apocrypha is an excellent translation, but it does have more gender inclusive language that the RSV didn't have. Some people like this and some don't.

    I don't think I've reviewed a Revised English Bible. I just did a search for it and found The Oxford Study Bible: Revised English Bible with Apocrypha / Edition 1. Looks interesting.
    Barns & Noble has it: Link: http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Ox...h-with-Apocrypha/M-Jack-Suggs/e/9780195290004.

    The RSV w/Apocrypha and NRSV w/Apocrypha are ecumenical translations and are even used in the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The CC has Catholic editions of both. The translation in the Catholic Edition is essentially the same. Most of the differences involve what is placed in the main body of text and what is placed in the footnotes in dealing with variants among manuscripts. Of course the Catholic commentaries in study Bibles of these versions will differ.

    I have the Apocrypha, but haven't read these Books yet. I keep meaning to. I noticed the new Bibles recently purchased in our Parish are NRSV w/Apocrypha.

    As I said before, I'm interested in an Orthodox Bible as well. Let me know if you find out more about the Orthodox Study Bible. It's interesting that the Orthodox would be so accommodating for "beginners."

    Hope you have a great weekend, Sean,
    Anna
     
  7. Sean611

    Sean611 Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    210
    Likes Received:
    222
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Lutheran (LCMS)
    Lol, isn't that the truth! I've heard some interesting stories about people who have visited Orthodox Churches, seems like some are more accomodating than others, to say the least! Some are very tied to the particular ethnic groups and not "fond" of outsiders it seems. Fortunately, the ones nearest me are very diverese and are mostly made up of Catholic and Anglican "refugees." :D

    Thanks, hope you have a great weekend as well!
     
    Anna Scott likes this.
  8. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    461
    Adam,

    You always make me laugh. :p

    Anna
     
  9. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    461
    It's always interesting to find out what Bibles people are using and what they think about them.

    I don't have the New Geneva NKJV. Somehow, I missed this one in my Protestant days. What do you think of this Bible and the commentaries?

    Anna
     
  10. Gordon

    Gordon Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    689
    Likes Received:
    492
    Country:
    Australia
    Religion:
    Franciscan - Anglican
    The reason I use the Olive Tree Bible reader software is because it allows me to mix and match study notes for differing translations with my favourite version of the Bible for study (NRSV).

    When I am reading the Bible for prayer and contemplation I use a paper based version as it just feels right and helps you to reach that quite place inside with the Holy Spirit.

    In my humble opinion - stay away from the paraphrase versions like 'The Message' they just seem so far removed from the original translations they become un-readable. :think:
     
  11. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    461
    Adam,
    I'm so sorry I missed your response to my questions about the New Geneva NKJV. I appreciate all your comments. I do like to compare commentaries. Eschatology is certainly one with many, many, many views. Of course, I always want to know what the "other guy thinks." :p

    I'll have to consider adding to my Bible collection. I can't seem to keep up. lol.

    Peace,
    Anna
     
  12. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    461
    I like paper too! I have way too many books, but can't seem to part with them.

    I like the NRSV also, probably because it is an ecumenical translation. I know even the Catholic Church uses the RSV and NRSV in the CCC. The NRSV has a wide audience of support.

    Anna
     
  13. Gordon

    Gordon Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    689
    Likes Received:
    492
    Country:
    Australia
    Religion:
    Franciscan - Anglican
    Hi Adam - the other convenience of using it for study or research is that once you buy your study guides, commentaries, dictionaries and non free versions of the Bible you can update all the devices you have, and sync via your Olive Tree account between the different devices. As example I use a mac I have the reader on my work machine, my iPhone, and iPad and my personal mac. If I highlight or write notes about a specific passage on my work machine and sync it with my Olive Tree account I can sync any of the other devices I own and my note will appear in the reader on that device. Great for taking notes on retreats etc. The reader is free and so are a couple of the different Bible versions KJV is one them and there are a number of free add ons that you can use. Once you are up and running only your wallet or credit cards will stop you from gathering a great collection of resources. :)
     
    Adam Warlock likes this.
  14. Gordon

    Gordon Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    689
    Likes Received:
    492
    Country:
    Australia
    Religion:
    Franciscan - Anglican
    Adam and don't forget to check out the pricing of their bundles they can save heaps - I didn't and found afterwards I purchased books individually that I could have purchased in a bundle as a great price. Also keep your eye out in email offers sometimes they are up to 30% off at different times of the year. :)
     
  15. Scottish Monk

    Scottish Monk Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    433
    Likes Received:
    300
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Christian
    Here are the study bibles on my shelf. I use the first three most frequently. The others I consult for various theological perspectives.

    The original Jerusalem Bible (no longer published) was my first study bible--I have had a JB with me during the past 45 years. My first recommendation for someone looking to buy a new study bible is the New Oxford Annotated Bible--the notes are brief and well-written, the maps are the best. The notes in the New Interpreter's Study Bible are more expository than the other study bibles--nice sermon gems. The Harper Collins Study Bible is similar to the Oxford Annotated Bible, but without the excellent Oxford maps. The Wesley Study Bible gives excerpts from John Wesley's writings in the notes. The Life in the Spirit Study Bible (no longer published) presents the spirit-filled charismatic perspective in the notes. The Catholic and Jewish study bibles present their perspectives in the notes.

    Jerusalem Bible (1966)
    New Oxford Annotated Bible, 4th edition, NRSV (2010)
    New Interpreter's Study Bible, NRSV (2003)

    Harper Collins Study Bible, revised edition, NRSV (2006)
    Wesley Study Bible, NRSV (2009)
    Life in the Spirit Study Bible, NIV 1984 (2003)
    Catholic Study Bible, 2nd edition, NAB revised (2011)
    Jewish Study Bible, Old Testament, JPS Tanakh (2004)

    ...Scottish Monk
     
    Anna Scott likes this.
  16. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    461
    Sean,
    Yes, I know there are Catholic and Anglican "refugees" in the Orthodox Church. A good friend is taking that route. It seems the Orthodox experience varies quite a bit. A friend from my Episcopal Church visited an Orthodox Church in our area. She was really impressed and found the people very friendly. It was a small Church and everyone stayed after the 2-hour service (Yikes) and had a meal together.

    I still can't believe I lived in Greece for 2 years and never visited the Greek Orthodox Church. I was a Southern Baptist at the time and had been told that the Orthodox were not Christians. I was seriously misinformed.

    Peace,
    Anna
     
  17. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    461
    Scottish Monk,
    Thanks so much for sharing your list. I haven't seen the 1966 Jerusalem Bible Bible. Though I do have The Catholic Comparative New Testament, which contains the JB and NJB along with the Douay-Rheims, RSV-CE, NRSV-Catholic Bible (Anglicized), NAB, Good News Translation, Christian Community Bible. It's great for comparison of Catholic Bible translations, but doesn't contain any commentary or study notes---and, again, it is only the N.T.

    Great thread.

    Anna
     
  18. Scottish Knight

    Scottish Knight Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    478
    Likes Received:
    526
    Country:
    Scotland
    Religion:
    Christian
    The two hour services you get used to quite quickly. The first service you find yourself swaying on your feet and wishing, almost begging the choir would sing faster :p but after a couple more services I actually turned round to my friend and said "oh short service today" at which she replied "What? It's been two hours" lol
     
    Anna Scott likes this.
  19. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    940
    Likes Received:
    689
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Anglican (ACNA)
    Now which of our Anglican study bibles has some of those features too?
     
  20. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    461
    Anglican74,
    I found a wonderful wealth of resources and suggestions for Anglicans at this link: http://anglicansonline.org/resources/biblical.html from the Anglicans Online website. I'm going to check each of these. I can't believe I hadn't found this before.

    Anna
     

Share This Page