Ramadan

Discussion in 'Non-Anglican Discussion' started by Aidan, Jun 4, 2016.

  1. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    Our Muslim brother believers in the One True God are about to enter another another Ramadan. I wish them a holy and peaceful time of worship
     
  2. Andy

    Andy Member Anglican

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    Does Islam worship the same God of Christianity? I do not know a great deal about Islam, but I understand that they do not believe that Jesus is God.
     
  3. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    I pretend no great expertise in this area, however this is what I understand.

    There are three great Abrahamic Faith Communities. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

    Judaism speaks of God, with various 'El' names, El Elohim, El Shaddai, El, and the unutterable tetragrammaton YHWH.

    Christianity speaks of God, Father Son and Holy Spirit, One God three persons. Christianity is born in Judaism and starts life in some sense as an extension of Judaism.

    Islam speaks of God using the Arabic Allah, clearly not far from the Hebrew El. Mohammad clearly saw in Christianity and Judaism monotheistic traditions of faith which he felt had lost the way and wandered from the pathway. The doctrine of the Holy Trinity was seen as a wandering too close to polytheism, though the prophet clearly saw christianity as monotheistic, some contemporary Islamic websites mock us relentlessly for the doctrine seeing it as gobbledygook.

    All three traditions understand the God they worship in terms of the God of Abraham. There is clearly a deal of common ground.

    That Islam accepts Jesus as a prophet, indeed a significant prophet, and probably ready to accept some of the account of the Virgin Birth and the Resurrection, but struggled deeply with the crucifixion and a theology of atonement. In the confusion, probably for most of the next couple of hundred years, the followers of the prophet Mohammed where often thought of as an outbreak of the Arian heresy, rather than a separate religion.
     
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  4. Andy

    Andy Member Anglican

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    Thanks for your insight Philip.

    Would you agree then, notwithstanding similar shared foundational aspects, that Islam is incompatible with Christianity and the triune God of the bible?
     
  5. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    Islam would never accept any trinitarian doctrine as they view it as putting partners with God. However, to answer your initial question, it's a monotheistic faith and worships the same God as Christianity and Judaism. Allah is not a name given to God, it's simply the Arabic translation of the word God. Arab Christians also say Allah when praying
     
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  6. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    Judaism: The Lord our God, the Lord is One

    Christianity: We believe in One God, the Father Almighty ..., We believe in One Lord Jesus Christ ... true God from true God, We believe in The Holy Spirit the Lord the giver of life ...

    Islam: There is one God, Allah, and Muhammad is the last prophet.

    I think Christianity is incompatible with Islam, in that we proclaim the divinity of Jesus which Islam sees as an assault on the notion of singular deity - Allah. I think Islam is perhaps incompatible with Christianity in that it understand the the prophet Muhammad represents a full stop on revelation, whereas for Christians the Day of Pentecost declares that the revelation of God continues.

    Islam understands the Koran as the words that Allah spoke directly to the prophet, and therefore they are not readily translated, and certainly not to be subjected to any form of what we would call textual analysis and literary criticism, as we are used to in our understanding of the Biblical texts. Whilst this understanding is in place it seems very unlikely that Islam will experience a reformation.

    Arianism would be more likely to be acceptable to Islam than Orthodox Christianity, but even still there would be difficulties.

    It is perhaps mostly the doctrine of the atonement that is the bar that Islam can not cross. Any notion that God would suffer death for the creation seems to them impossible, any notion that he would allow his son to die for the sins of others is impossible to contemplate as it seems to deny a sense of justice in the divinity.

    I repeat my earlier declaration that I make no pretense of understanding Islam, though I have read a little in order to improve my knowledge and try and make more sense of what is happening in the world in which I live.
     
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  7. zimkhitha

    zimkhitha Active Member

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    All religions are incompatible with each other (my opinion), however I understand Islam to be the worship of the one God. There is, afterall one God and since they claim to worship Him, I prefer to take them at their word.