On vestments

Discussion in 'Sacraments, Sacred Rites, and Holy Orders' started by DeusExMachina, Jun 30, 2016.

  1. DeusExMachina

    DeusExMachina Member

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    I was wondering a few things about the historic place of various vestments in Anglicanism. I know stoles are allowed by the BCP, (but as I understand it tippets are more common) but can the color of the stole change with the liturgical season? I know copes are a required part of ordination garb, but are they allowed to be worn at any other time?
    Also, about headware: I realize that the practice among some bishops of sporting a mitre is largely a product of the Oxford movement (please correct me if I am wrong) but how did historical Anglicanism feel about other types of headware, such as birettas or Bishop Andrewes Caps?

    Thanks for your help.
     
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  2. DivineOfficeNerd

    DivineOfficeNerd Active Member Anglican

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    As far as I am aware, within pre-Oxford Movement Anglicanism, the color of the Stole changed if Churches had multiple colors. However, stoles were much less common. Bishop Andrewes Caps were extremely common, but Birettas were a product of Newman. I can't comment on Copes, though I recall that they were used in Laudian Communion Services.
     
  3. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    The Ornaments rubric is normally seen as an authority.

    "And here is to be noted, that such Ornaments of the Church, and of the Ministers thereof, at all Times of their Ministration, shall be retained, and be in use, as were in this Church of England, by the Authority of Parliament, in the Second Year of the Reign of King Edward the Sixth."

    This first appeared in the 1559 edition of the Prayer Book of Elizabeth 1. Edward's reign began on the 28th day of January 1847, so the second year is taken to be from the 28th day of January 1548 to the 27th day of January 1549.

    The 1549 Prayer Book was passed by parliament on the 21st day of January 1549. It contained this rubric

    “Upon the day, and at the time appointed for the ministration of the Holy Communion, the Priest, that shall execute the Holy ministry, shall put upon him the vesture appointed for that ministration, that is to say: a white Albe, plain, with a vestment or Cope. And where there may be many Priests or Deacons, there so many shall be ready to help the Priest in the ministration, as shall be requisite; and shall have upon them likewise the vestures appointed for their ministry, that is to say, Albes with Tunicles.”​

    This was replaced in 1552 with this rubric

    “And here it is to be noted, that the minister, at the time of the Communion, and at all other times in his ministration, shall use neither alb, vestment, nor cope; but . . . being a priest or deacon, he shall have and wear a surplice only.”​

    It would seem on the surface the restoration of the classic traditional vestments of the Church has some strong support, and certainly seems like a reasonable reading.

    In 1662 the rubric was revised to read

    “And here it is to be noted that such ornaments of the church and of the ministers thereof, at all times of their ministration, shall be RETAINED and be in use, as were in this Church of England by the authority of Parliament in the second year of the reign of King Edward the Sixth.”​

    The Puritans at this stage it seems were keen to remove the requirement to wear the surplice (this may well have been more an issues of Matins and Evensong), none the less, there desire was not upheld.

    This is but a review of the rubric. In terms of the usage of the Church one must acknowledge that at some stage the use of classic and traditional vestments must have fallen into some disuse, and it's revival during the period of and following the Oxford Movement from the 1830's was certainly a source of some broad consternation.

    In summary, therefore I would conclude that the Anglican use of vestments is varied. he use of the chasuble seems mandatory in some places and prohibited in others.

    My feeling is that just as clothes maketh not the man, so vestments do not make the sacrament. None the less I am concerned when my surgeon appears in greasy overalls, or my mechanic in a three piece suit.
     
  4. Jenkins

    Jenkins New Member Anglican

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    Concerning the use of copes, the 24th of the 1604 Canons, which is entitled, “Copes to be worn in Cathedral Churches by those that Administer the Communion”, says, “In all Cathedral and Collegiate Churches, the holy Communion shall be administered upon principal Feast-days, sometimes by the Bishop if he be present, and sometimes by the Dean, and at sometimes by a Canon or Prebendary, the principal Minister using a decent Cope, and being assisted with the Gospeller and Epistler agreeably, according to the Advertisements published An. 7 Eliz. …”

    The only other clerical vestments mentioned in those canons are the surplice, hood and tippet.