Morning and Evening Prayer Lectionary

Discussion in 'Faith, Devotion & Formation' started by bwallac2335, Jan 29, 2022.

  1. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Well-Known Member

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    I have noticed in the 1928 BCP that I just got that the lectionary jumps around with the liturgical year. In the 2019 and 1662 the lectionary is pretty much just straight through the Bible except for Holy Days. I prefer the straight through the year as it is easier to keep up with and follow along with. Which one do you prefer?
     
  2. Carolinian

    Carolinian Active Member Anglican

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    I prefer the 1928 (although it does have some major problems) because the readings are shorter and more topical to the liturgical year. I understand that some people feel that the shorter readings are a problem, but I don't have the time in the mornings as of yet for longer readings.
     
  3. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Well-Known Member

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    Is your the 1940 lectionary of the 1928 or the original? As of right now I don't know the difference.
     
  4. Carolinian

    Carolinian Active Member Anglican

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    I have the 1940 as far as I am aware.
     
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  5. PDL

    PDL Well-Known Member Anglican

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    I do prefer readings to reflect the liturgical day rather than just reading the Bible straight through as it were. I think liturgy should reflect the liturgical day. However, I by no means want this to happen all too frequently. Certainly for Sundays and the more important holydays. We can always read the Bible outside of the liturgy and there concentrate on reading it straight through or at least a significant chunk without interupting the sequence.
     
  6. Invictus

    Invictus Well-Known Member

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    I prefer 'in course' overall, but understand the need to interrupt it for feast days (provided they're kept to a minimum, as failure to do this is precisely what led to the need to simply the Divine Office to the Prayer Book's Matins and Evensong in the first place). The 1979 does a reasonably good job of this (I'm not as familiar with the 1928 - I think that lectionary was revised in 1940 or 1943 - or the 2019), in my experience. No lectionary is going to be perfect when you have 'competing' Temporal and Sanctoral cycles. There is much to be admired about the original 1662 lectionary (and I think it's a good idea for Anglicans of all stripes to take a year praying the Daily Office from the 1662 using the original lectionary and the Litany, to get the full sense of Cranmer's original vision, and to have a sense of where we've come from and how and why we've arrived where we are today liturgically), but there is also a reason it has been reformed many times since.