Meat on Fridays?

Discussion in 'Faith, Devotion & Formation' started by AnglicanUSGirl2, May 19, 2018.

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  1. AnglicanUSGirl2

    AnglicanUSGirl2 New Member

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    I've recently returned to Anglicanism, and I'm trying to re-learn the rules. I have a question: Do Anglicans abstain from meat on Fridays? And if so, which meats?
     
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  2. Shane R

    Shane R Active Member

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    That is largely a lost discipline in Anglicanism. Most of the time, it is only observed by the most strict Anglo-Catholics. A few more people pick it up during Lent, if they have even heard of it. In too many circles, any form of fasting is unheard of.

    As to how to do it: abstain from all forms of meat and poultry. Fish has traditionally been the out. However, the whole spirit of the practice is to dine more simply for the day. And fasting is never an end unto itself, but an opportunity to make space for prayer and reflection. If meat is not particularly meaningful to you, then choose something which is - which you will notice the absence of. For some it could be alcohol or pop or gourmet coffee drinks, etc.

    All of that is Roman practice. When one looks East, fasting becomes progressively more strict. The Copts eat what is essentially a Vegan diet for more than 1/2 of the year. Most of the Eastern disciplines, when fasting, eliminate meat, dairy, and oil. It leads to some very simple fair with lots of grain, vegetables, and usually massive amounts of lentils. And yet, some interesting dishes can be prepared in this manner. Lots of recipes are available online.

    Another one which few still observe is the Eucharistic fast. The basic principle behind the Eucharistic fast is for the body and blood of Christ to be the first food consumed in the day. Again, the East has remained rather strict on this while Rome has gradually reduced the requirement to strict abstinence for only one hour prior to the Mass. The new Roman practice has gone away from the old principle and is only really asking people to take an hour to prepare for Mass.

    One other note: children under 14, the infirm, and women who are pregnant or nursing are excused from the fast.
     
  3. Anglican04

    Anglican04 Active Member Anglican

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    What Fr. Shane said. Many find fasting to be an extremely beneficial practice (especially in Lent) so I would recommend it. It doesn't have to do with just food though, you can fast from pretty much anything like social media, TV, games, whatever you like. Fasting is a great way to end attachment and become detached. Start out small and slowly advance in your abstinence.
     
  4. JoeLaughon

    JoeLaughon Active Member Anglican

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    The Historical Dictionary of Anglicanism notes;

    "In the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, there is a list of "Days of Fasting, or Abstinence," consisting of the 40 days of Lent, the ember days, the three rogation days (the Monday to Wednesday following the Sunday after Ascension Day), and all Fridays in the year (except Christmas, if it falls on a Friday)."
     
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  5. Lowly Layman

    Lowly Layman Well-Known Member Anglican

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    In the South, I grew up eating at fish buffets on Fridays
     
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