Liturgies of our prayer book

Discussion in 'Liturgy, and Book of Common Prayer' started by Dave Kemp, Jun 6, 2019.

  1. Dave Kemp

    Dave Kemp New Member

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    I've recently, since moving to America, started to become interested in our prayer books from around the anglican communion, I’m a 1662 man myself but I attend a ACNA church plant and a lot of our congregation are former TEC and they all love the 1928 BCP, I don’t own a 1979 one yet and I haven’t heard anything good about it.

    What do The American anglicans think of the two? The 1662 has pretty much been unused in most of the CofE over the last many years but it’s making a comeback slowly but surely, the prayer book society gives each new ordinand a copy as they start thei training.
     
  2. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    The 1928 is widely seen as a 1662+.

    Essentially in the same tradition, just amplified with things like more collects for more various occasions of life.

    It also has things like the Family Prayers which are easier to do than a full-blown Evensong (and even they come from the British side of the pond; we just happened to have officially incorporated them into our BCP).

    That being said, I'm a 1662 man myself. I love the 1928, but ultimately it will get pinched between the antiquity of the 1662 and the progressivism of whatever the contemporary liturgy may happen to be. We should retroactively incorporate new/fun things from the 1928 and just make a one mega-amplified 1662. Holding on to the 1928 will probably not make sense in a 100-year timeframe.
     
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  3. Shane R

    Shane R Active Member

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    I agree with this sentiment. Even in the most Anglo-Catholic reaches of the Continuum, revision is now occasionally discussed. Bp. Hewitt suggested a revision using the American Missal as a base. There's no traction yet but it will gain traction if the 'G4' can actually achieve unity and the old-guard that was present at St. Louis is all gone. There are still a few crusty relics of that period hanging around that seem to have an outsized voice in the business of the Continuing churches.

    To the OP: what I consider special about the 1662 is that it contains rites for use at sea. I was in the Navy for five long years (also known as 5 1/2 years, but the VA doesn't give credit for partial years of service). I had a little pocket edition that I could, quite literally, tuck into any of the lower pockets of my coveralls. I got a lot of use out of that book. I still have it sitting on the shelf over my desk and use it at times. When I pass, my wish is to be buried at sea using the 1662 BCP.

    That said, any of the classic prayer books should be put through an NKJV like update. Update the syntax, replace the archaisms. I hear a lot of guys, including one of my closest colleagues, argue that you just have to educate the congregation. But I think taking the time to explain some of the odd phrasings and dis-used words in the BCP is distracting and sometimes even unproductive.
     
  4. Will_

    Will_ Member

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    I find this interesting as I had not heard about such a proposed revision of the 1928 BCP. Would you happen to know where one could learn more about this suggestion by Bp. Hewitt?
     
  5. Shane R

    Shane R Active Member

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    He mentioned it a few times in his book of a couple of years ago "The Dayspring From on High". The book is a hard read and badly needed an editor but, among the myriad reports and some of his random theological tomes, he discusses a few things that he hopes for going forward.
     
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  6. Will_

    Will_ Member

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    Thanks! I found the book (somewhat to my surprise) available on Kindle. I might get it and see what he says.
     
  7. Fr. Brench

    Fr. Brench Member Anglican

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    There is a small-ish entourage of American Anglicans who love the 1662 Prayer Book the most. Obviously they don't use it for legal and canonical reasons, but they prefer it over the perceived anglo-catholic intrusions of the 1928 book. Getting to know the 1928 is probably your best stop for learning the traditional difference between English and American Anglicanism.

    Unless you really enjoy comparative liturgical studies, getting a 1979 book is really not necessary. You can probably grab one for free from an ex-episcopalian if you want. I admit I'm biased, but the upcoming 2019 book is the best contemporary-style option out there.
     
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