Liberal churches are dying. But conservative churches are thriving. [WashingtonPost]

Discussion in 'Anglican and Christian News' started by World Press, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. World Press

    World Press Active Member

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    Liberal churches are dying. But conservative churches are thriving.

    A Canadian study found that conservative churches are still growing, while less orthodox congregations dwindle away.

    By David Haskell January 4
    David Millard Haskell is a professor of religion and culture at Wilfrid Laurier University.

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    Presbyterian churches like this one in New Jersey shouldn’t vest their hopes in liberal theology. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

    Mainline Protestant churches are in trouble: A 2015 report by the Pew Research Center found that these congregations, once a mainstay of American religion, are now shrinking by about 1 million members annually. Fewer members not only means fewer souls saved, a frightening thought for some clergy members, but also less income for churches, further ensuring their decline.

    Faced with this troubling development, clergy members have made various efforts to revive church attendance. It was almost 20 years ago that John Shelby Spong, a U.S. bishop in the Episcopalian Church, published his book “Why Christianity Must Change or Die.” It was presented as an antidote to the crisis of decline in mainline churches. Spong, a theological liberal, said congregations would grow if they abandoned their literal interpretation of the Bible and transformed along with changing times.

    Spong’s general thesis is popular with many mainline Protestants, including those in the United Methodist, Evangelical Lutheran, Presbyterian (U.S.A.) and Episcopal churches. Spong’s work has won favor with academics, too. Praising Spong’s work specifically, Karen L. King of Harvard Divinity School said in a review of Spong’s book that it “should be required reading for everyone concerned with facing head-on the intellectual and spiritual challenges of late-twentieth-century religious life.” Harvard Divinity professor and liberal theologian Harvey Cox said “Bishop Spong’s work is a significant accomplishment,” and indeed, Cox himself has long been at the task of shifting Christianity to meet the needs of the modern world. Thus, liberal theology has been taught for decades in mainline seminaries and preached from many mainline pulpits. Its enduring appeal to embattled clergy members is that it gives intellectual respectability to religious ideas that, on the surface, might appear far-fetched to modern audiences.

    But the liberal turn in mainline churches doesn’t appear to have solved their problem of decline.

    Over the last five years, my colleagues and I conducted a study of 22 mainline congregations in the province of Ontario. We compared those in the sample that were growing mainline congregations to those that were declining. After statistically analyzing the survey responses of over 2,200 congregants and the clergy members who serve them, we came to a counterintuitive discovery: Conservative Protestant theology, with its more literal view of the Bible, is a significant predictor of church growth while liberal theology leads to decline. The results were published this month in the peer-reviewed journal, Review of Religious Research.

    We also found that for all measures, growing church clergy members were most conservative theologically, followed by their congregants, who were themselves followed by the congregants of the declining churches and then the declining church clergy members. In other words, growing church clergy members are the most theologically conservative, while declining church clergy members are the least.


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  2. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    This isn't surprising. Right-minded people respect substance which is lacking in liberalism
     
  3. apologetic

    apologetic Member

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    I've found that liberal anglicans are often more educated and insightful than their more conservative counterparts. Although conservative christians generally take the teachings of Christ more seriously in my experience than their liberal counterparts. Both belong to the Church and are simply different aspects of the Church so it is unfortunate that any part, whether liberal or conservative, decline.
     
  4. Lowly Layman

    Lowly Layman Well-Known Member

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    What is your basis for that statement?

    I myself am a conservative and am relatively well-educated. I hold a masters degree and a juris doctorate. I'll defer to other about my insightfulness.
     
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  5. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    Totally untrue.
     
  6. apologetic

    apologetic Member

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    Sorry if I caused offence. I didn't say or mean to imply that all conservatives are uneducated, I was speaking generally for my personal experience that liberals are more educated the conservatives. In regards to most issues I am conservative myself, so my comment wasn't intended as a criticism, otherwise I would be being critical of myself.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2017