Ignatius (Loyola not Antioch)

Discussion in 'Faith, Devotion & Formation' started by CFLawrence, Apr 11, 2019.

  1. CFLawrence

    CFLawrence Member

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    Hello people much smarter than myself. I am curious to know if any of you have done the Spiritual Exercises of St Ignatius or the 19th Annotation.

    I am thinking about using the website/book Sacred Space in my daily devotions which is compiled by the Irish Jesuits and appears to be Ignatian mental prayer in the same vein as the spiritual exercises.

    Also at the end of the day I was debating adding the Ignatian Examen using a book called Reimagining the Examen by I can’t remember who.

    So just to put it out there for discussion...

    How many of you engage daily in Mental Prayer and what books/resources do you/did you rely on?

    How do you feel about Ignatian prayer or any of what I just mentioned as an Anglican?

    CF Lawrence
     
  2. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    I did a website a while back for a pair of Australian ladies who were quite big on it, but sought to understand it from an contemporary Australian perspective. I found it quite helpful and the book is a real gem. I had always expected something from the Jesuits to be super RCC, but in the end concluded it was essentially oecumenical and scriptural. I would not fear much in this.

    http://www.movingtostillness.com.au/
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  3. CFLawrence

    CFLawrence Member

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    Thank you. You must have sensed my slight trepidation.
     
  4. Tiffy

    Tiffy Active Member

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    Ignatian meditation can be very helpful in revealing hidden blocks to individual personality development and 'feeling after God, that we might find Him', but I think it should always be combined with proper bouts of Biblical study, rather than becoming the main means of imbibing scripture.
     
  5. CFLawrence

    CFLawrence Member

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    Thank you this far but what I realized was I was barking up the wrong tree all along. I just quickly read A Call to Prayer by J. C. Ryle and found what I was looking for , a book on private prayer. I am so immersed in liturgical prayer but keep moving in a more Puritan/Calvinist direction. When I pray the Office I’m not praying. I need to get on my knees and pray from my heart which between the Office and Rosaries and centering prayer, is something I don’t do. Private prayer to me is alien.
     
  6. Edmundia

    Edmundia New Member

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    The Ignatian method relies on the IMAGINATION which our Eastern orthodox brethren view as the lowest and most despised faculty. Many traditional Roman Catholics are suspicious and critical of the Counter Reformation spirit and praxis and prefer the old Liturgical way; meditation on the Sacred Scriptures and use of the Divine Office of the (old) Breviary; much less regimented and less aggressive,sentimental and emotional . Dr Geoffrey Hull's book THE BANISHED HEART studies the problems of the abandonment of the liturgical spirit, the old Liturgy and the importance of the Eastern Rites.
    I like Eric Milner-White's MY GOD,MY GLORY: a wonderful old style High Anglican bridge between mental and vocal prayer. Anglican Laity could pray the Offices of Mattins and Evensong and/or the Little Hours [Prime and the Hours or the Cuddesdon Office Book]
     
  7. Fidei Defensor

    Fidei Defensor Active Member

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    I’ve applied Ignatius of Loyola’s teachings on compulsive comfessing. I like Martin Luther became a compulsive confessio, and Ignatius of Loyola battled it until he realized that its a demonic, since it would have you compulsively confessing and wasting the time you could be ministering, preaching the godspell, and helpimg souls. I learned of Ignatius’ struggle with compulsive confessing via his writings: Saint Ignatius of Loyola’s Personal Writings, Penguin Classics.

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  8. Edmundia

    Edmundia New Member

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    Sorry, I was sleepy yesterday !
    There is an Anglican "version" or use of the Spiritual Exercises (possibly two) by Canon Donald Nicholson, formerly director of Stacklands Retreat House in Kent - a place devoted to Ignatian Spirituality within the Church of England. he produced a little Lent book published by the Church Union in about 1975.There might be second hand copies or the Church Union might have a photocopy. I think that one of the Cowley Fathers did an Anglican version of the Excercises a long time ago, but have no details in my poor old brain this morning.
     
  9. Fidei Defensor

    Fidei Defensor Active Member

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