Holy Day Devotions

Discussion in 'Feasts, Fasts, and Church Calendar' started by Adam Warlock, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    In 1662, at least, the Athanasian Creed replaces the Apostles' Creed in Morning Prayer on a Holy-day or red-letter day.

    Dec. 25 (Christmas)
    Jan. 6 (Epiphany)
    Feb. 24 (S. Matthias)
    Easter Sunday
    Ascension (Thurs)day
    Pentecost Sunday
    Trinity Sunday
    June 24 (John the Baptist)
    July 25 (James the Apostle)
    August 24 (Bartholomew)
    Sept. 21 (S. Matthew)
    Oct. 28 (Ss. Simon and Jude)
    Nov. 30 (S. Andrew)

    From a 1693 copy of the BCP:

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

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  3. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

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    Sean,
    I'm not a guru, but The Creed of Saint Athanasius is under Historical Documents of the Church in the 1979 BCP.
     
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  4. Sean611

    Sean611 Well-Known Member

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    I thought i'd post a few references that some of us (especially us Episcopalians) may find helpful or expand our knowledge of our Church and calendar. (Note i'm not posting anything to be contrary or to start any sort of argument, i'm just providing some references for those who may find them helpful for their devotions and/or understanding. If you don't like them or have issue with TEC calendar, a new thread on those issues would be more appropriate I would think).

    The following link offers a brief explanation of the Episcopal liturgical calendar. It's noted that TEC uses the term "saint" to mean any Christian man or women who has set a good and Godly example of a Christian life. TEC recognizes that all baptized Christians are saints of God and have the potential to become a good example to others. Thus, TEC does not "canonize" saints.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendar_of_saints_(Episcopal_Church_in_the_United_States_of_America)

    The official liturgical calendar with feast days and saints honored can be found in the '79 BCP and the book called "Lesser Feasts and Fasts" and is updated every three years. The last official revision is the "Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2006." The following website uses "Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2006":

    http://www.lectionarypage.net/

    Further, TEC has a completely new revision that was published in 2009 called "Holy Women, Holy Men: Celebrating the Saints." This new revision was approved for trial use only in 2009 and was approved again for trial use only at GC 2012.

    Here is a description of "Holy Women, Holy Men":

    "Fully revised and expanded, this new work is the first major revision of the liturgical calendar of the Episcopal Church in more than 40 years! It is the official revision of Lesser Feasts and Fasts and authorized for trial use by the 2009 General Convention. All commemorations in Lesser Feasts and Fasts have been retained, and many new ones added. Three scripture readings (instead of current two) are provided for all minor holy days. Additional new material includes a votive mass of the Blessed Virgin Mary, many more ecumenical commemorations, plus a proper for space exploration."

    "Holy Women, Holy Men" has been met with some controversy as some of the holy men and women honored were not Christians. However, most of its contents is "by the book" and "ecumenical" in nature. (Note--I don't wish to turn this thread into an argument about this resource, a new thread could be made to discuss this resource and its failings).

    Link to the calendar making use of Holy Women, Holy Men:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calendar_of_saints_(Episcopal_Church_in_the_United_States_of_America)

    Link for hard copy of this resource:

    http://www.amazon.com/Holy-Women-Me...83211&sr=8-1&keywords=lesser+feasts+and+fasts
     
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  5. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

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    Sean,
    Great link. I clicked "September" and then today's date, which took me to Edward Bouverie Pusey with Collects and Lessons. Nicely, presented.

    You will also find Edward Bouverie Pusey on Calendar of the Church Year, according to the Episcopal Church. If you clink on Edward Bouverie Pusey, it takes you to a brief biography, in addition to prayers, and Scriptures.

    I like both links used together.

    Will check out your other links later. Must get some things done.
     
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  6. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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    I'm declaring myself The Invisible Anglican for the end of page 2. :D
     
  7. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

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    Sean,
    One more thing, Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria is on the Calendar for May 2 with two quotations from the writings.
     
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  8. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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  9. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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    Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday of this week are the autumn Ember Days (BCP pp. 17-18, 182 or 233, 205-206 or 256-257). These days feature special prayers for vocation - for those to be ordained (Wednesday), for those discerning a ministry call (Friday), and for all Christians in their vocations (Saturday). There are four sets of Ember Days, one for each season. Prayers appropriate to the season are generally raised during this time. Thus, the autumn set would include prayers and thanksgivings for the harvest. These are optional observances in the Episcopal calendar.

    There are a number of Catholic resources that describe these days, such as New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia, About.com Catholicism, and Fish Eaters. Interestingly, the Wikipedia article indicates that the Roman timing of the Autumn days can differ from the Anglican timing, as ours is based on fixed dates rather than on weeks. I have read that the Ordinariate parishes observe them based on the Anglican system rather than the Catholic. Since these days are optional and rarely observed among Anglicans, and since our web presence isn't as vast as the Catholic one :D, there's not as much out there about Anglicans and Ember Days. The Catholic custom seems to be one of fasting and penitence. I know some ACNA Anglicans who observe the Days, but they don't fast. They just focus their prayers on topics of vocation and season. They also decorate their home with a seasonal wreath. This helps them remember to pray with thanksgiving. I talked to one priest who observes the Days, and he simply tries to "get serious" in prayer. He doesn't fast. I get the sense that today's Anglican observation isn't necessarily a penitent one, although it could have been that way historically.

    The Ember Days do not have Eves. St. Matthew's Day is on Friday, and it does have optional Eve readings (BCP p. 1001). Since St. Matthew's Day is a Major Feast, it takes precedence over Ember Day II (BCP p. 16), but the Ember collect for that day may still be read. If one fasts during the Ember Days, there would be no fasting on Friday because of the Feast.

    Much credit goes to Fr. John Woolley, who had an excellent "Calculating Religious Festivals" Anglican web page that seems to have been taken down. I once saved it to my computer and still have the text if anyone is interested.
     
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  10. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    The Ember Days were for fasting in the past. It was not penance in the Roman sense; its goal was to grow in hunger for God, so as to get away from the pleasures and comforts of the world. Fasting on the Ember Days reminds us that Christ is the one for whom we were made, and our goal. As the seasons change, it is good to remember that we are just as inconstant and fragile. Those who are gluttonous, sensuous, and pleasure-seeking really need the Ember Days. It's a repentance, if fully carried out. :)

    1962 Canadian Book of Common Prayer:

    DAYS OF FASTING ... SOLEMN PRAYER to be observed in the Anglican Church of Canada

    Major Fast Days: Ash Wednesday and Good Friday

    Days of Solemn Prayer:

    1. The Ember Days at the Four Seasons, being the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday after Advent III, Lent I, Pentecost, and Holy Cross Day (Sept. 14).
    2. The Rogation Days, being the Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday before Holy Thursday, or the Ascension of our Lord.

    ~

    I think this idea that Christians have to abstain from meat is very odd. Paul warns against the days when the eating of meat are forbidden by Christian authorities, and in Romans 14 he praises liberty of conscience in deciding when to abstain, individually. The BCP doesn't explain what we must abstain from, but the assumption is an easy one to make. Abstaining from a specific creature given by God for our enjoyment seems queer to me. :) Regardless, there it all is.

    Note that our spiritual grandfather, the 1662, does not prescribe "Solemn Prayer" for these days, as do the 20th century books. This is because every prayer is a solemn communication with the infinite God of eternity. There's nothing frivolous about that.
     
  11. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    I promise to post the Collect, Epistle, and Gospel of any important devotional days and holy days the night before.

    1962 Canadian Ember Days:

    Collect

    "Almighty God, the giver of all good gifts, who of thy divine providence hast appointed divers Orders in thy Church; give thy grac,e we humbly beseech thee, to all those who are to be called to any office and administration int he same; and so replenish them with the truth of thy doctrine, and endue them with the innocency of life, that they may faithfully serve before thee, to the glory of thy great Name, and to the benefit of thy holy Church; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen."

    Epistle: Romans 12:3-18
    Gospel: Luke 10:2-9

    The Litany is very fit for use on Ember Days, because after asking that the Lord illuminate all bishops, priests, and deacons with true knowledge and understanding of His Word, this petition is inserted:

    "To bless thy servants at this time to be admitted to the order of Deacons or of Priests, and to pour thy grace upon them; that they may duly execute their office to the edifying of thy Churh, and to the glory of thy holy Name; we beseech thee, good Lord."
     
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  12. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

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    Adam,
    Let me know what you find. When I read the confession of the Creed posted by Consular, it seems like we have done this as part of the Liturgy. I just can't remember for sure. Maybe it was Trinity Sunday.
     
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  13. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

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    I just realised that the second Ember Day coincides with S. Matthew the Apostle's red letter holy-day. Assuming that this overtakes the importance of an Ember Day, do we feast for Matthew or fast for the Embers? :think:

    Drink your liquids today, folks! :p
     
  14. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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    Yes. Majors replace optionals, so there would be no fasting on Friday.

     
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  15. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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    If you're a good cook, or merely interested in the home side of things, this is a great article to check out: Catholic Cuisine: Ember Days and Autumnal Fasting. Don't let the title fool you. It is actually about food. Menus and recipes after the first picture. :D
     
  16. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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    Collect for Wednesday (Ember Day I, BCP p. 256):

    Almighty God, the giver of all good gifts, in your divine providence you have appointed various orders in your Church: Give your grace, we humbly pray, to all who are [now] called to any office and ministry for your people; and so fill them with the truth of your doctrine and clothe them with holiness of life, that they may faithfully serve before you, to the glory of your great Name and for the benefit of your holy Church; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.
     
  17. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Does this mean that it, like all the other "historical documents" there, is listed for 'historical value'? I'm not familiar with how to interpret this.
     
  18. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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    I'm no expert, but I always assumed that they just meant "these are important, but they don't fit in the other sections of the book." :) They're things that aren't really used in the worship service ordinarily, but they still wanted to be sure that they were included.
     
  19. historyb

    historyb Active Member

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    All Saints are Saints it matters not what Christian Church they were canonized in.
     
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  20. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

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    Tonight is the Eve of St. Matthew! Optional Evening Prayer readings may be found on BCP p. 1001.
     
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