Holy Day Devotions

Discussion in 'Feasts, Fasts, and Church Calendar' started by Adam Warlock, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    1,402
    Likes Received:
    1,127
    Country:
    Canada
    Religion:
    Anglican
    The Apostles gave us the divine scriptures: the histories of those events which are our holy-days. Hildegard has nothing to do with these great burning fires of sacred light.

    This thread isn't turning into anything; this is an Anglican site. I'm sure you won't have any opposition if you talk about von Bingen or Francis of Assisi on Catholic Answers, but don't expect evangelical and reformed people not to prowl around here. We can't stand the mingling of mighty ecumenical holy-days with trivial feasts and commemorations.

    Go on with Hildegard if you want. I only opposed it because I don't like the idea of this thread turning into a calendar of the saints. I'll just post independent replies here on Sundays and red-letter days.
     
  2. Sean611

    Sean611 Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    219
    Likes Received:
    242
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Anglican Catholic
    I never said that Hildegard was anywhere near as important or more important than the Apostles. I said that there are a ton of examples, outside of the Apostles, that we can learn from and that are good and Godly examples of faith in action.

    I know that this is an Anglican site and I posted about Hildegard because I watched a great film on her life several months back, noticed today was her calendar day, and the intentions of this thread being that of learning more about Holy Days and devotions of posters....it is a perfect fit! Except, you took my post as promoting some kind of papalism and attacked it and made rude comments about who Hildegard was for no real good reason. If today was a Holy Day for some great reformed person, evangelical or otherwise, I would have absolutely posted it because I believe there is a lot to learn from many great and Godly Christian people recognized by the Calendar and otherwise, even if we may not be in 100% agreement on everything.


     
  3. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    1,402
    Likes Received:
    1,127
    Country:
    Canada
    Religion:
    Anglican
    I forgot about the Collect, Epistle, and Gospel for Trinity 15!

    First, I wish to apologise to Sean for being in such an ill-temper. I've been reading the Church Fathers on Matthew 16 all day, and they have inflated my combative mood. Mea culpa. Please forgive me and my pride.

    Secondly,

    THE FIFTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER TRINITY, 1962

    Collect: (identical to 1662)

    "Keep, we beseech thee, O Lord, thy Church with thy perpetual mercy; and, because the frailty of man without thee cannot but fall, keep us ever by thy help from all things hurtful, and lead us to all things profitable to our salvation; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen."

    Epistle: Galatians 6:11-18 (God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ)
    Gospel: Matthew 6:24-34 (Do not be anxious for food and clothing: look at the birds of the air and the lilies of the field)

    I personally find it interesting that the word "glory" appears twice in these readings for Trinity XV. 1. We should not glory in our individual works, or in any human wisdom, but in Christ; and, 2. even the glory of Solomon was nothing compared to the flowers, which flourish one day and which are cast into an oven the next.

    For me, this speaks many volumes about God and His mercy. Glorying in ourselves (and our opinions of other Christians' worship services :blush:) is not fitting or holy, because we can only glory in the One who is glory itself. Solomon was arrayed in much human splendor and glory, but his earthly kingdom split in two shortly after he died - just as the natural glory of a flower (even more beautiful than Solomon's palaces) perishes within a day.

    Only the glory of God - in His love, being incarnate, and in His mercy, being crucified for us - is capable of receiving endless and infinite praise. Only that eternal, infinite glory which compels God to the cross and the tomb, can resurrect the faltering kingdom and the dying flower. We should not trust in our own splendor, reputation, and good name; we should be trusting in His glory, which shone fully on the Cross of our Lord & Saviour the Messiah.
     
  4. nkygreg

    nkygreg Member

    Posts:
    94
    Likes Received:
    92
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Franciscan Order
    Maybe this is a simplistic view of Holy Days/Feast days but, were not these set aside as teaching opportunities? The early church used Holy Days/ Feast Days as well as stained glass windows, as a teaching tools for the people. Most churches didn't even have a copy of the scriptures. If they did it was were few were able to read it.
    If I am correct and I am open to correction, isn't Tradition one of the legs of the Anglican/Cramners 3 legged stool?
     
    Anna Scott and Adam Warlock like this.
  5. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    1,402
    Likes Received:
    1,127
    Country:
    Canada
    Religion:
    Anglican
    Scripture is the basis and foundation of all our doctrine, nkygreg. Since some passages are obscure, our God-given reason can look into them. Other passages may have longstanding traditions of interpretation attached to them. Only Scripture's truth is absolute; the next two are for the knowledge of Scripture. That's what I think anyway. :)

    ~

    Would it be appropriate to post specialised Collects, lessons, epistles, and gospels for Ember days here?


    ~

    EVERYONE, DON'T FORGET TO PRAY WITH THE ATHANASIAN CREED ON SEPT. 21, S. Matthew's day. This is the tradition in Anglicanism: recite it on each feast day of an Apostle, which is an holy-day. The whole beloved doctrine of God is set forth in it. For those who have no access to it in their BCP:

    WHOSOEVER will be saved : before all things it is necessary that he hold the Catholic faith.
    Which faith except every one do keep holy and undefiled : without doubt he shall perish everlastingly.
    And the Catholic faith is this : that we worship one God in Trinity, and Trinity in unity;
    Neither confounding the persons : nor dividing the substance. For there is one person of the father, another of the son : and an other of the holy ghost.
    But the Godhead of the father, of the son, and of the holy ghost, is all one : the glory equal, the majesty co-eternal.
    Such as the father is, such is the son : and such is the holy
    ghost.
    The father uncreated, the son uncreated : and the holy
    ghost uncreated.
    The father incomprehensible, the son incomprehensible : and the holy ghost incomprehensible.
    The father eternal, the son eternal : and the holy ghost eternal.
    And yet they are not three eternals : but one eternal.
    As also there be not three incomprehensibles, nor three uncreated, but one uncreated, and one incomprehensible.
    So likewise the father is almighty, the son almighty : and the holy ghost almighty.
    And yet they are not three almighties : but one almighty.
    So the father is God, the son is God : and the holy ghost is God.
    And yet are they not three Gods : but one God.
    So likewise the father is lord, the son lord : and the holy ghost lord.
    And yet not three lords : but one Lord.
    For like as we be compelled by the Christian verity : to acknowledge every person by himself, to be God and lord.
    So are we forbidden by the Catholic religion : to say there be three Gods, or three Lords.
    The father is made of none : neither created nor begotten.
    The son is of the father alone : not made nor created, but begotten.
    The holy ghost is of the father and of the son neither made, nor created, nor begotten, but proceeding.
    So there is one father, not three fathers, one son not three son : one holy ghost, not three holy ghosts.
    And in this Trinity none is afore nor after other : none is greater nor less then an other.
    But the whole three persons : be co-eternal together and coequal.
    So that in all things, as is aforesaid : the unity in Trinity, and the Trinity in unity, is to be worshiped.
    He therefore that will be saved : must thus think of the Trinity.
    Furthermore, it is necessary to everlasting salvation : that he also believe rightly in the incarnation of our Lord Jesu Christ.
    For the right faith is, that we believe and confess : that our lord Jesus Christ, the son of God, is God and man;
    God of the Substance of the father, begotten before the worlds : and man of the substance of his mother, born in the world.
    Perfect god, and perfect man : of a reasonable soul, and human flesh subsisting.
    Equal to the father, as touching his Godhead : and inferior to the father, touching his manhood.
    Who although he be god and man : yet he is not two, but one Christ.
    One, not by conversion of the Godhead into flesh : but by taking of the manhood into God;
    One altogether, not by confusion of substance : but by unity of person.
    For as the reasonable soul and flesh is one man : so God and man is one Christ.
    Who suffered for our salvation : descended into hell, rose again the third day from the dead.
    He ascended into heaven, he sitteth on the righte hand of the father, god almighty : from whence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead.
    At whose coming all men shall rise again with their bodies : and shall give account for their own works.
    And they that have done good, shall go into life everlasting : and they that have done evil, into everlasting fire.
    This is the Catholic faith : which except a man believe faithfully, he cannot be saved.

    Glory be to the father, and to the son : and to the holy ghost.
    As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall bee : world without end. Amen.
     
    Anna Scott likes this.
  6. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    325
    Likes Received:
    262
    That would certainly make sense. It would be a great chance to learn about someone, honor their legacy, and perhaps find inspiration in one's own journey. They're a major part of our history, and Tradition is one of the legs of the stool. :D
     
    Sean611 likes this.
  7. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    325
    Likes Received:
    262
    I'm looking forward to the autumn Ember Days. :D Do you have special lessons for them? We only have collects. Also, our tradition (at least where I live) has a slightly different mood than the Catholic tradition. I'm curious to see what others have to share.
     
  8. Toma

    Toma Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    1,402
    Likes Received:
    1,127
    Country:
    Canada
    Religion:
    Anglican
    Adam, page 210 in the 1962 Canadian hardcover BCP has an official set of Collect, Epistle & Gospel for all Ember days. The Autumn days have a special alternative set on pg. 245, specifically geared toward prayer for "LABOUR AND INDUSTRY", which may be used on Labour Day as well.

    You can see them Wednesday. ;)

    When I was taught the faith in RCIA (a deplorably simple process in this archdiocese), Ember days were not even mentioned. The practice has totally gone out of the average "Novus Ordo" Catholic parish/diocesan life. I didn't even know they existed, let alone what they were, until I stumbled across the traditionalist Catholic site called Fisheaters. I was quite shocked to see that Anglicans have such things!

    I still don't know what the "Catholic tradition" is for Ember days. Not even the quasi-traditional Franciscans here talk about them. How do they differ?
     
  9. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    325
    Likes Received:
    262
    As it turns out, the 1928 BCP has readings also, along with special instructions. I'm already learning new things from this thread!
     
    Anna Scott likes this.
  10. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    471
    Consular, my young brother in Christ, not everything requires an argument.

    Let's just go with Adam's intent for the thread.

    I'm really interested in how other Anglicans are observing Holy Days.

    Peace and blessings,
    Anna
     
    Toma likes this.
  11. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    1,811
    Likes Received:
    1,324
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Anglican (ACNA)
    :)
     
    Anna Scott and Toma like this.
  12. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    2,711
    Likes Received:
    2,512
    Country:
    America
    Religion:
    Anglican
    I'm staying out of the Hildegard discussion :)
     
    Anna Scott likes this.
  13. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    471
    nkgreg,
    Anglican is based on Scripture, Tradition, Reason. Some see Reason connected with the Holy Spirit.

    Stained glass windows are part of telling the story, as are icons.

    Excellent point about the Holy Days/Feasts being "teaching opportunities."
     
    nkygreg and Adam Warlock like this.
  14. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    471
    Adam,
    I haven't examined a 1928 BCP. Sounds like I need to. :)
     
  15. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    325
    Likes Received:
    262
    If you ever want to take a look, this BCP site has a pdf of the 1928. It's at the very bottom of the page.
     
    Anna Scott likes this.
  16. Sean611

    Sean611 Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    219
    Likes Received:
    242
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Anglican Catholic
    Fascinating, I have a copy of the '28 BCP and I haven't dug near deep enough into it.
     
  17. Anna Scott

    Anna Scott Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    585
    Likes Received:
    471
    Consular,
    Way to go! This is a very inspiring contribution to the thread topic. I knew you had it in you, brother. :D
     
    Toma likes this.
  18. Sean611

    Sean611 Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    219
    Likes Received:
    242
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    Anglican Catholic
    Agreed, I had no idea that that praying with the Athanasian Creed was the tradition on an Apostle's Feast Day.

    A few questions for you '79 BCP gurus out there. First of all, is the Athanasian Creed in the '79 BCP? Secondly, at what point during Morning and Evening Prayer do we pray with the Athanasian Creed? Thanks!!
     
  19. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    325
    Likes Received:
    262
    If anyone ever wants to see the "month at a glance," there are some great resources out there:

    The Daily Office from the Mission of St. Clare has links to the liturgical calendar month. The days are color coded. In addition to the readings, they have music and commemorations for the different days. They also link to information on the Catholic, Coptic, and Orthodox saints for the days.

    The Lectionary Page has the Episcopal calendar for the entire year (2012 here, 2013 here). This is extremely helpful. It is also color coded. The Lectionary Page contains links to the readings and collects for the day. Unlike St. Clare, you can see the entire year at once.

    Both of these are great examples of how rich and varied our observances can be. Neither of them are the only way to pray the Office and observe the Holy Days, but they are very good ways to do so. Both include some things that I don't do, and they might not include things that I always do. But that is to be expected! They are fantastic resources. If similar sites exist for the other countries represented here, feel free to share them!
     
    nkygreg and Anna Scott like this.
  20. Adam Warlock

    Adam Warlock Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    325
    Likes Received:
    262
    The Athanasian Creed is on p. 864 in the Historical Documents. The text can be pretty small back there...might want to read it online! Other than Trinity Sunday, I haven't seen it used very much. I need to do some digging and see what I can find...
     
    Anna Scott likes this.