"Generic" title page for 1928 BCP?

Discussion in 'Liturgy, and Book of Common Prayer' started by Will_, Oct 24, 2019.

  1. Will_

    Will_ Member

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  2. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    Yes. The other printing has a jurisdiction specific title page for APA. I didn't realize they are printing them with both lectionaries for the '28 BCP now.
     
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  3. Will_

    Will_ Member

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    Thank you! That is what I needed to know. And I too noticed both lectionaries are included in these BCPs. I could see some people liking that.

    Appreciate your help.
     
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  4. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    You mean the RCL? Please no. Nooooooooo!!!!! Horror of horrors!

    Seriously, there are no words in the English language adequete to express my opposition to the Revised Common Lectionary. One plus of being in an Oriental church is we shall surely never use it due to the idiosyncratic systems each of the Eastern rites uses. But of the Western rites, the Anglicans have such a good traditional lectionary, that using the RCL instead is a gargantuan step backwards.

    Here is a brilliant article from a Canadanglican* priest on why the RCL is a disaster compared to the traditional lectionaries in the 1962 Canuck BCP, the 1928 American BCP, the 1662 BCP, the 1929 Scotch BCP, and so on: http://liturgy.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/LitCan_Oct_05.pdf

    *I recently came across this loving nickname for our Anglican brethren up north and love it. And the 1962 BCP is the last of the great traditional BCPs to be published, sadly. Canada also gave us one of the greatest Anglican composers, Healey Willan.

    I have also heard of the ECUSA and other American Anglicans being referred to as “Yankeepiscopal” amusingly enough.
     
  5. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    No. The 1928 BCP had two lectionaries in its life span. The initial lectionary was oriented more to the seasons of the church year. The second lectionary, which debuted in 1945, was more systematic in working through the readings. Obviously, this adjustment was made long before the advent of the RCL.
     
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  6. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Ah, you mean that lectionary. I am breathing a deep sigh of relief. The facsimile scan I have of the Standard Book is a reprint with the 1943 lectionary. IIRC the lectionary presently used with the 1662 BCP was also revised within that general timeframe, 1922 if memory serves.

    The 1928 amd 1943 lectionaries are both decent enough in my opinion. The only pre-1979 lectionary deterioration I am aware of was the obtuse decision on the part of the Canadian province to delete the final verses of “By the waters of Babylon” (Super flumina, Psalm 137:7-9), based on a literal Antiochene interpretation of the imprecatory Psalms which is fundamentally wrong. Alas Wesley made the same mistake in his Sunday Service Book and deleted the imprecatory Psalms wholesale, replacing them with hymns, largely those composed by his brother, which he then numbered within the same 150-number sequence, which I do have to confess I find annoying. But if the American Methodists still used that book and followed its instructions, for example, if one could go to a Methodist parish and partake of the Eucharist every Sunday, and pray the Litany every Wednesday and Friday, that would be very good indeed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2019
  7. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    Well, the Australians beat out TEC with their 1978 book, the first they did after being granted autocephaly by the CoE. It has a 3 year cycle. It also counts 'Ordinary time' rather than Sundays after Epiphany and Trinity - which doesn't really bother me, but some guys get apoplectic about calling part of the church year 'ordinary.'
     
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  8. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Ordinary Time is used by several churches. The Methodists historically had the besf system in my opinion, in that they split the Sundays after Pentecost into two seasons, the second one entitled Kingdomtide, ending on the Sunday of Christ the King, the last Sunday before Advent, and Kingdomtide was also embraced by several other mainline churches, and indeed I believe the Romans also have that commemoration, although at the time Kingdomtide was implemented, the Romans did refer to all of those Sundays between Trinity Sunday and the start of Advent, and the Sunday after Epiphany and Septuagesima, as Tempus per Annum.

    The Methodists spiced things up in terms of liturgical colors, by the way, through the use of red during the Sundays after Pentecost, and Green during Kingdomtide. I like this. Conversely, the Church of England, while not formally defining Kingdomtide as a liturgical season, suggested red vestments during the same second half of ordinary time, which also works, and aligns with the fall foliage and Reformation Sunday.

    Whitsunday itself is interesting in that, like Palm Sunday, both red and green are established as historically valid colors for it. The Eastern Orthodox for example usually use green for Palm Sunday, Whitsunday and All Saints, which is celebrated on the same day as Trinity Sunday in the West (Pentecost or Whitsunday is regarded as a Trinitarian feast in the Orthodox church, so it is frequently the parish feast day for churches named Holy Trinity). Conversely, in the West, Red is more common on these days, due to Passiontide starting on Palm Sunday, and due to the tongues of fire on Pentecost. In the East, these tongues are symbolized by green foliage, but the superabundant foliage brought in (which also is responsible for the name Whitsunday, if memory serves, due to wheat being used for this purpose in England), is an ancient custom which dates back to Judaism and the Jewish feast of Pentecost, so to this day one will also find, on the Jewish feast of Pentecost, which usually predates the Gregorian feast by a few days, a superabundance of green foliage.

    ACROD (the Carpatho-Rusyn Eastern Orthodox) did once use in their cathedral purple vestments on Palm Sunday, which I did not like, but it is hypothetically allowed, except I believe the ancient rubrics in the Typikon (which specify vestment colors only as “light” or “dark”) do require light vestments for that feast. But it could be a regional adaptation from Latin practices; the Ruthenians were heavily Latinized and have delatinized to some extent, both in the Uniate and Orthodox parishes. But I would expect their Typikon looks different from the Sabaite or the Violakis typikon editions in common use elsewhere.
     

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