Essay on the proper Catholic teaching on Images

Discussion in 'Faith, Devotion & Formation' started by Stalwart, Jun 8, 2022.

  1. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Fr. Ben Jeffries has a nice and scholarly review on the ancient and Catholic doctrine of images, seen as late as the Latin Libri Carolini, but present in a unanimous consensus among the Church Fathers as well (as I’ve documented here: https://forums.anglican.net/threads/update-of-church-fathers-on-images-rejecting-them.4220/)

    He responds to some of the iconodule mythology against the Libri Carolini, used to justify Nicea II. It’s a completely slam dunk case, that the only (ancient and unchanging) Catholic teaching on images is this: they may be used for commemoration, but not in worship:
    https://northamanglican.com/on-the-rightful-rejection-of-nicea-ii/
     
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  2. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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  3. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Right. In the last 100 years, rejection of icons in worship began to be seen as a "low church" position, while the opposite became "high church". But Fr. Jeffries is very much a high churchman, and he makes a high church traditional case against icons in worship.

    These categories like high/low/evangelical, are becoming less and less relevant as we move forward. You're either a traditional Anglican or not. And either our Anglican tradition is fundamentally rooted in errors (in which case why be one), or it's a remarkable and incredible retrieval of actual authentic Church teaching, against pretty much everyone out there. Which would make for an incredible reason for why be an Anglican. We have the fullness of the truth.
     
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  4. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Ji packer says something similar in his ‘Heritage of Anglican Theology’ -

    "The one thing I ask you to adjust right at the start---before we get into any of the nitty-gritty ---is the notion that real Anglican theology is the Protestant evangelical tradition without any input from the world of High Church theology or the world of rational divinity. My friend, it ain't so. We would like it to be so; we would like to think that Anglican theology is not this kind of hybrid animal. We would like to think that it is simpler, clearer, and purer than it is. But it is this kind of animal, and those of us who are Anglicans have to come to terms with that.

    So, realize that I am calling into question the assumption that Anglican evangelicalism has already spoken the last word on God's truth. It hasn't."
     
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  5. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Well-Known Member

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    Anglican theology should be patristic not evangelical. Any departure from that is a mistake. We made some of those in our founding and we had to eventually start to correct them
     
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  6. Ananias

    Ananias Well-Known Member Anglican

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    What does "evangelical" even mean these days? The word has been stripped of any precise meaning over the past decades -- it's an empty vessel now, and filled up with whatever people want to put into it. I prefer the term "reformed" (as in the tradition of the Reformers), and to the extent that global Anglicanism is a reformed church, it fits. It puts boundaries around our theology, even if those boundaries are ill-defined and permeable. (But when has it ever been otherwise with Christians?)

    I do think the global Anglican communion has its own ideas of what form Anglican theology and practice will ultimately take. It may be us in the anglophone countries who pose this question, but it will be Anglicans of the global south who answer it in the years to come.
     
  7. Invictus

    Invictus Well-Known Member

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    I think that as the term is used in America, there are two distinctives that seem to cover most modern uses of the word:
    1. A central focus on having a conversion experience;
    2. Prioritizing an individual's relation to God above the corporate relation to God realized in and through the Church. (There really does not seem to be any concept of Church (capital) in evangelicalism, beyond that of an ad hoc assembly of individuals; it is not something that has a permanent character or enduring life of its own.)
     
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