Buying Roman Catholic Jewley and etc.

Discussion in 'Faith, Devotion & Formation' started by Fidei Defensor, Apr 8, 2019.

  1. Fidei Defensor

    Fidei Defensor Active Member

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    Hello my Angli brothers and sisters.

    I want to buy a St. Jude Crucifix. St. jude is patron of “lost causes.” I have issues with the Cult of the Saints, veneration of dead saints, and people precieving me to be RCC because of jewlery when I am not. I happen fo like the symbolism of Jude, the idea of “lost causes”, Like Rhett I hVe weakness for lost causes, “I've always had a weakness for lost causes once they're really lost.” (Margaret Mitchell/ Rhett Butler, Gone With The Wind).

    The question is, can I have a Catholic Saint madellin crucifix when I admire what it stands for, but I do not hold the Catholic view of intercessiojs for and from the dead? Can I coopt it? Or is destined to remain beyond my reach?
     
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  2. Spiritus

    Spiritus New Member

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    From the RCC view there’s no issue. I know several Anglo-Catholics who own and wear medals/Crucifix associated with saints. As with most things I think it would depend on the Individual Anglican whether or not it would be viewed as appropriate.
     
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  3. Fidei Defensor

    Fidei Defensor Active Member

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    Thank you. I am inclined to make the purchase of the St. Jude Medallion. Martin Luther once chastised radicals under Karlstadt who were tearing down crucifixes, and said “the is an inage of our Lord, why are you purging over assumes popery?” (Paraphase). In the same way, a saint image csn either be venerated in RCC tradition or simply an inspiring picture of an actusl servant of Christ whom you eish to emmulate in faith or who said and did things you admire. For instance, The Canterbury Cross was omce associated with a Catholic office od Archbishop and was a pilgrim collectsble for Catholics who visited St. Thomas Beckett’s shrine. Now it is an Anglicsn symbol because the Archbishop of Canterbury is head of the Anglican Church. So it seems to me symbols, icons, medals, and even crosses can have multiple layers of meaning; you can chise ehat it means to you and in accordsnce with your church tradition.

    To quote Pope Gregory:

    “Answer of the blessed pope Gregory: Your Fraternity knows the use of the Roman Church, in which you have been nurtured. But I approve of your selecting carefully anything you have found that may be more pleasing to Almighty God, whether in the Roman Church or that of Gaul, or in any Church whatever, and introducing in the Church of the Angli, which is as yet new in the faith, by a special institution, what you have been able to collect from many Churches. For we ought not to lovethings for places, but places for things. Wherefore choose from each several Church such things as are pious, religious, and right, and, collecting them as it were into a bundle, plant them in the minds of the Angli for their use.” (From The Eccleiastical History of the English Speaking People, Book I, Chapters 29-33, Bede, Penguin Publishers, or Fathers of the Church, Registrum Epistolarum, Book XI, Letter 64).
     
  4. Theistgal

    Theistgal New Member

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    I get that (some, not all) Anglicans are leery about praying to saints, perhaps with good reason. But I would assume there's a middle ground, like admiring someone for their fidelity to Christ against terrible odds, or their demonstrated charity and love for their enemies, etc. Perhaps wearing a medal or looking at an icon can simply be a way to remind you of that Christian whose virtues you'd like to emulate.

    "Dear God, I really admire the devotion to Saint Jude, who has apparently inspired a lot of people to hope that You'll answer their prayers, no matter how hopeless. Please help me, too, to keep my faith strong and remember that 'all things are possible' with You. Thank you!"

    (or something like that.)
     
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  5. Religious Fanatic

    Religious Fanatic Well-Known Member

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    It's funny Gregory was mentioned, as I wanted a Gregory medal at one point. I also have a St. Benedict dominican rosary. Yes, we can respect them without venerating them, and I too am concerned about being confused for RCC (or even Orthodox) when I am not. But, still, to each their own. Depends on who you know and where you're going.
     
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  6. JoeLaughon

    JoeLaughon Well-Known Member Anglican

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    By definition an issue of res indiferentes
     
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  7. Theistgal

    Theistgal New Member

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    I had to laugh, because I'm also active on an Orthodox forum, and they have the same concerns about being mistaken for RCC. "Sure, we use prayer beads, and we venerate saints, but but but we're NOT the same as those horrible Latins!"

    To paraphrase Tom Lehrer, "everybody hates the Romans!" :D
     
  8. Fidei Defensor

    Fidei Defensor Active Member

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    That is great middle ground approach. Emulate not venerate.

    One of the reasons we Reformed believers are leery of prayers to the saints and intercessions of the saints is these passages:

    “For there is one God and one mediator between God and mankind, the Son of Man Christ Jesus.” (1 Timothy 2:5, ATB)

    “Who then is the one who condemns? No one. Christ Jesus who died--more than that, who was raised to life--is at the right hand of God and is also interceding for us.” (Romans 8:34)

    “My dear children, I write this to you so that you will not sin. But if anybody does sin, we have an advocate with the Father—Jesus Christ, the Righteous One. He is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for ours but also for the sins of the whole world.” (1 John 2:1-2)

    Pope Gregory is the only pope I quote.

    I am glad someone else than myself is uneasy about being misidentified as RCC when they are not. :cheers:

    I love crucifixes and wearing them, but people always ask, “are you Catholic?” As in RCC? I should respond to be pithy, “yes I am, according to the Apostle’s Creed I am part of Holy Catholic Church.” :thumbsup:

    Even though Orthodox are Romans lol! :DConstantinople and the seat of the Patriarchate of Orthodoxy since circa 312-323 A.D. was Eastern Roma. Byzantine Christianity or Orthodoxy is Roman. I am aware Orthodox believe their church began at Pentecost/Acts 2 in circa 33 A.D., (source Katherine Clark, Orthodoxy Simple Guides). However I do argue the Byzantine Church and how Orthodoxy appears was influenced majorly by Constantine and its seat in Modern Turkey.
    :bishop:
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2019
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  9. Theistgal

    Theistgal New Member

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    Sshhh -- don't tell them that! Them's fightin' words! :D
     
  10. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    Constantinople was capital of the Roman Empire longer than Rome was. The formal title given to the city by Constantine was Nova Romanum.
     
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  11. Fidei Defensor

    Fidei Defensor Active Member

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    Etu Brut! Deus Vult! :D:sword:

    Indeed, until it fell to the Crusaders in 1204 A.D. and then again in 1453 A.D. to the Ottomans.
    :gramps:
     
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