BCPization

Discussion in 'Liturgy, and Book of Common Prayer' started by Moses, Nov 2, 2020.

  1. Moses

    Moses Member

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    I know that the BCP drew heavily from pre-reformation English liturgy, especially the Sarum use. When Anglicanism spread to non-English speaking countries that were already Christian, did they attempt to BCPize any other rites? For example, were there ever BCP versions of the Byzantine, Mozarabic, or Coptic liturgies?
     
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  2. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Well-Known Member

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    If they did I would love to buy one.
     
  3. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Great question. There was obviously an adaptation of the English BCP to the other provinces and languages in the Anglican Communion, but I don't know if this was applied to jurisdictions outside of Anglican bounds.
     
  4. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    You might like to investigate the works of John Mason Neale, who translated much Eastern content into English. Less prolific but also important in that field was Lightfoot.
     
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  5. Fr. Brench

    Fr. Brench Active Member Anglican

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    I believe the Reformed Episcopal Church in Spain (or some such name) uses a form of the Mozaribic Rite.
     
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  6. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    It should be noted that is a Canterbury Communion church, not at all related to the REC founded by Bp. Cummins in 1873.
     
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