Baptist Commuion

Discussion in 'Sacraments and Holy Orders' started by Traditionalist, Dec 23, 2018.

  1. Invictus

    Invictus Well-Known Member

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    I see the sacramental theology of the Eucharist as secondary to the rite itself. The Eucharist has always been for Christians what the Hajj always has been for Muslims: as a public sign of universal communion, it has to be done in a certain way, i.e., one that fulfills specific criteria, or it is neither obeying the command which instituted it nor fulfilling the purpose for which it was instituted. A so-called "Lord's Supper" which uses shortbread and grape juice is not the Eucharist, and it is hardly a sign of Christian unity if one's particular group claiming nevertheless to be performing it does so completely differently from everyone else.
     
  2. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

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    I agree, it is not the Eucharist (and they don't claim that it is). For them it is "communion," a substantially different rite. Yet both are, or can be, an anamnesis of our Lord's death for our redemption; therein lies the unity of all redeemed believers.
     
  3. Invictus

    Invictus Well-Known Member

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    Please note that when I say “it is not the Eucharist”, I am saying that it does not fulfill the Lord’s command and example as to how it should be done. What we call it is secondary to the rite itself.
     
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  4. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Well-Known Member

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    Memorialism is a man made up rite. It is outside of the church and has no place in the church.
     
  5. Invictus

    Invictus Well-Known Member

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    It cannot be a true anamnesis unless it follows the Lord’s command and example for how it should be done. It cannot be a sign of Christian unity if they’re doing it differently from everyone else.


    I guess that depends on what is meant by “memorialism”. (I agree with you about the Baptist/low church evangelical version of it.) The Lord’s command was to “do this in remembrance of me”. If we adhere to the properly Semitic understanding of a ‘memorial’, it has a mystical connotation that involves returning spiritually to the moment of the rite’s institution. Partaking of communion makes us all present at the Last Supper in a mystical fashion, just as observant Jews believe all Jews are present at the first Passover when it is celebrated. And by recalling his death, Jesus has a real presence in our will, motivating us toward repentance and moral union with God.
     
  6. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Well-Known Member

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    I am going with the common understand of the Baptist communion memorialism
     
  7. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps you could expand on that and explain what you mean by "following the Lord's command and example for how it should be done." He took the bread and spoke over it, then he took the cup and spoke over it. How precise does a "true anamnesis" need to be? If we say that the contents of the cup need to be fermented, then do we also say that the ingredients of the bread need to be the same as that which Jesus spoke over? Do we say that the bread must be unleavened, just as that bread was? Does the cup need to be of the same metal composition as the one Jesus passed around? Does the table need to be a certain height? Do we need to recline about the table as the disciples did? In other words, where do you want to draw the line and why, and how is that line not arbitrary?
     
  8. Ernesto Jardim

    Ernesto Jardim Member

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    I would advise against that. Attending is one thing, but receiving signifies that one believes in something different to one's "bread" and beliefs. In other words, it could be scandalous.

    Just simply smile and pass along the collection plate if you don't want to give anything.

    What did your parent's or Sunday school teacher's teach you? Perhaps do some reading as well?