Any traditional Anglican monasteries in North America?

Discussion in 'Questions?' started by Liturgyworks, Oct 29, 2019.

  1. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    The Order of the Holy Cross would be particularly lovely, or an Anglican order in a traditional jurisdiction. I am not sure I am cut out for the rigour of Orthodox monasticism, but that might well depend on the monastery and the attitudes of the monks. The accomodations for the monks at St. Anthony’s in Florence, AZ, are quite good, and there is a ROCOR monastery in Washington I want to check out. Also, St. Mark’s Syriac Orthodox Monastery is highly appealing.

    There is an Order of the Holy Cross monastery which is alas in the Episcopal Church, but I plan on visiting it. I would love to work there; the main annoyance is that OHC monastics are inducted at a crowded monastery on the East Coast.

    But a monastery under ACNA, or better yet, a Continuing Anglican province, or better still, an Anglican Benedictine monastery in the UK, for example, the monastery where Dom Gregory Dix worked, would be splendid. Of course, it might be very difficult to immigrate to Britain for purposes of joining a monastery.

    It has also occurred to me to organize an order in The Episcopal Church based on the Order of Preachers, Dominicans, which would function somewhat as a church-within-a-church much like the OP under St. Dominic, with a zeal for combatting heresy. This would have to be downplayed of course to get approval. Now, I don’t like what happened to the Dominicans after St. Dominic died, in terms of their involvement in the Inquisition; St. Dominic created the order to preach to the Albigensians, and not to kill them, but a lesser known fact is the Fransiscans are just as guilty, and I myself am not really a fan of St. Francis of Assisi. There is also a very likeable pair of smaller orders whose main vocation was ransoming persons taken captive by Muslim pirates, but who now serve as general purpose friars, the Trinitarians and Mercedarians.

    The Eastern churches do not have friars per se, although hieromonks and archimandrites from the monasteries are often assigned to smaller parishes as a cost-saving measure. These monks in turn provide a pool from which bishops are selected.
     
  2. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    Bethlehem priory of the ACC is the most well known. They are a Benedictine order and the physical location is in Michigan.
     
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  3. bwallac2335

    bwallac2335 Active Member

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    I am curious as to why Orthodox orders are to strict. What do you mean by that?
     
  4. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Not strict; rigorous. The Trappists are an example of a religious order that is strict. Orthodox monasticism is comparatively gentle, but it can be physically demanding in terms of the workload, depending on the monastery. Some monasteries like the famous one founded by Fr. Seraphim Rose in Northern California, lack modern conveniences. Also some monasteries are dangerous due to Islamic terrorism and bandits; the Syriac Orthodox monasteries in the Tur Abdin region of Turkey are built like castles, and this is fortunate, because at night, the heavy iron doors and the tall outer walls are the only security, and these monasteries do not have many monks. There are more monks at Mar Mattai in Iraq, but this monastery was in extreme peril in the recent war. St. Catharine’s in Sinai, which has a priceless collection of icons that predate iconoclasm, and also an immensely valuable library which is fortunately being digitized, and which has other things as well of interest to all Christians, depends on friendly Bedouin tribes to which it provides free healthcare for protection. These monasteries also have the most demanding physical workloads due to the lack of conveniences and in many cases, very few monks.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2019
  5. Liturgyworks

    Liturgyworks Well-Known Member Anglican

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    I will take a look. That sounds rather interesting.
     
  6. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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  7. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    Then there is the Company of Jesus: http://www.companyofjesus.org/

    That order does not subscribe exclusively to one school of monasticism. I know the new Abbot -he lives a few miles from me- and he is a Franciscan. They haven't updated the website yet to reflect the change. He told me the order is ecumenical and will accept members from any trinitarian Christian church but all of their leadership is canonically resident in ACNA.

    Abbot Tim had a monastery in Newport News, VA. It was leased and the landlord sold the property. He's been working for about 4 years to get a new site. He's got a parcel of land and a building grant from ACNA to begin the first phase but he's run into problems with zoning.
     
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  8. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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  9. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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    Then there's The Cistercian Order of the Holy Cross: http://cistercianmonks.org/special-note-from-abbot-general/

    That group is based out of Winston-Salem, NC. They were a partner of the Orthodox Anglican Communion for some time but that relationship was broken about 2 years ago. The Order entered full communion with a fringe Canadian group that allows parishes to maintain dual membership by remaining in the Anglican Church of Canada. Not long after they also entered into communion with some fly by night Western Rite orthodox group.

    Abbot Oscar's lines of succession are strictly old Catholic and independent Catholic -and I'm not talking about reputable lines like the +Hodur or +Duarte Costa successions (he might have the +Iglapay succession of the Philippine Independent Church). I'm talking about old Catholics that no one knows who they are and can't find anything out about them. He's been known to wear a Cardinal's cap from time to time (and I'm not talking about the baseball team).
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2019
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  10. Jeffg

    Jeffg Active Member

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