Anglican Catechism?

Discussion in 'Questions?' started by Antony, Aug 10, 2019.

  1. Antony

    Antony Member

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    I've been reading a catholic catechism recently. It's a useful way of aqcuiring an overview of the faith. I've found an anlgican equivanlent from 1662. Is this the only one? What other documents and/or books would you recommend for somebody who would like to gain deeper knowledge of Anglicanism and its tenets?
     
  2. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    The Church Catechism is intentionally a lot shorter than the Protestant and Roman Catholic catechisms, because it seeks to harken back to the Apostles Creed, and the general apostolic philosophy regarding creedal documents. It is short, and 100% authoritative. However one good entryway are the commentaries on the Catechism, such as the Beveridge commentary on the catechism:
    https://books.google.com/books?id=83VjAAAAcAAJ
    https://www.anglican.net/works/william-beveridge-church-catechism-explained-1720/

    And I've found this catechism from the 16th century to be helpful as well:
    https://www.anglican.net/works/alex...r-the-institution-of-christian-religion-1572/


    Note, also, that the Roman Catholic Catechism is not actually a catechism at all, properly speaking, because it does not follow the question and answer format. It's just a summary collection of RCC doctrines in an essay format, so even this they have named incorrectly.
     
  3. Antony

    Antony Member

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    Thank you for guiding me toward these brilliant resources.
     
  4. Anglo-cracker

    Anglo-cracker Member Anglican

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    ACNA has published a catachism titled "To Be a Christian"
     
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  5. Will_

    Will_ Member

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  6. Shane R

    Shane R Well-Known Member

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  7. anawkwardaardvark

    anawkwardaardvark Member Typist Anglican

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    Can anyone help me decipher the references in Nowell's Middle Catechism? For example, the first reference is "Acts 11.d, 16.", but how does this translate? It seems like Acts Chapters 11 and 16 are referenced without a particular verse in mind and the letter throws me off. It is like this throughout the catechism.

    Please educate me in my ignorance!
     
  8. Elmo

    Elmo Member

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    This seems somewhat helpful a discussion Bible Notation (e.g., What does Gen 13:7b mean?) - Faithlife Forums (logos.com)
     
  9. anawkwardaardvark

    anawkwardaardvark Member Typist Anglican

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  10. Br. Thomas

    Br. Thomas Active Member

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    Persons new to the Anglican Catholic Church are referred to "Anglican Catholic: Faith & Practice". It is written by the Archbishop/Metropolitan Mark Haverland.
     
  11. ZachT

    ZachT Well-Known Member

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    Nowell's "Middle Catechism" was published in 1572. Robert Estienne's Textus Receptus was published in 1551, which was the first bible to use the chapters and verses we know today. It took a decent chunk of time, around 100 years, before everyone began to use Estienne's verses. I imagine Nowell just didn't use a bible with chapters and verses. Verses do exist in some earlier non-English manuscripts, but the verses are different to the one's Estienne came up with.

    Likewise Stephen Langton, the Archbishop of Canterbury who went to town on King John and kick started the Magna Carta, was the first guy to come up with the chapters we all use today. Any works you read prior to ~1200 won't have chapters, and there's also a solid chance if it's not written in English and does use chapters it won't use Langton chapters until ~1350.

    One of the perks of reading old texts.
     
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  12. anawkwardaardvark

    anawkwardaardvark Member Typist Anglican

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    It gets curiouser and curiouser as Nowell's Longer Catechism, which predates the Middle Catechism, has traditional chapter and verse citations. I'm sure the Middle Catechism's chapter and letter citation have meaning, but I cannot yet discern how to interpret it. Quite a shame as I was hoping to use it in our parish.
     
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  13. ZachT

    ZachT Well-Known Member

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    Nowell's 1563 Catechism (Catechismus puerorum, or "A Catechism for Boys") did not have verses. If your edition has verses it's a later publication where the editor has inserted them for the readers convenience - much like reading a modern print of Augustine who predates chapters and verses by more than a thousand years, but nevertheless appears to have them in his works.
     
  14. Botolph

    Botolph Well-Known Member

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    and there was strife between the herders of Abram’s livestock and the herders of Lot’s livestock. At that time the Canaanites and the Perizzites lived in the land.
    Genesis 13:7

    and there was strife between the herders of Abram’s livestock and the herders of Lot’s livestock.
    Genesis 13:7a

    At that time the Canaanites and the Perizzites lived in the land.
    Genesis 13:7b

    The practice of dividing verses has become much more popular in the post-Vatican II world, with new lectionaries providing many more sorter readings and split readings.

    I hope that helps. It usually is reasonably easy to determine based on punctuation.

     
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