“Evangelical Anglican”

Discussion in 'Questions?' started by Geer, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. Geer

    Geer New Member

    Posts:
    22
    Likes Received:
    10
    Country:
    Cyprus
    Religion:
    Anglican
    Can somebody explain “evangelical Anglican” to me please?
     
  2. Oliver Sanderson

    Oliver Sanderson Member

    Posts:
    25
    Likes Received:
    44
    Country:
    UK
  3. A Garden Gnome

    A Garden Gnome Member

    Posts:
    73
    Likes Received:
    64
    Country:
    England
    Religion:
    Anglican
    Hi Geer

    Are you new to Christianity and Anglicanism? Just wondering because you're young like myself and are asking a few questions about generic terms used within Anglicanism. Would help to give some context for our answers on here.

    As to the question, Evangelical can mean a lot of things. Generally I would describe it as placing a heavy focus on Scripture, as opposed to the focus on church tradition that those of a more catholic tradition do. So, as a result, you'll see low church practices within evangelical churches. This generally means less ritual and ceremony, less decoration, less of a focus on the Eucharist, and more of a focus on the scriptures. There are, of course, different "levels" of being evangelical. At the very extreme end, you'll see those who take everything in the Bible totally literally, including the creation narrative, etc. On the other, well, you move into more catholic territory. You'll get different answers from different people though.
     
  4. Geer

    Geer New Member

    Posts:
    22
    Likes Received:
    10
    Country:
    Cyprus
    Religion:
    Anglican
    Thanks, I am new to Christianity and Anglicanism, I just got baptised a month ago
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
  5. Brigid

    Brigid Active Member Anglican

    Posts:
    161
    Likes Received:
    99
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    AngloCatholic
    Yay! Welcome!
     
  6. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    3,667
    Likes Received:
    1,844
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Christian attending ACNA
    That's fascinating. I came to Anglicanism about 9 months ago after nearly 3 decades in Protestant churches which call themselves evangelical. But their definition of evangelical is totally different. To them it means taking part in spreading the Gospel; this can include supporting missionaries and full-time evangelists with prayers and finances, giving out New Testaments or Gospel tracts, actively seeking opportunities to talk about God's grace through Jesus Christ to friends and acquaintances, and pretty much anything that might help fulfill the Great Commission and hopefully bring more people to faith in Christ. I am still kind of amazed and puzzled by the Anglican definition.
     
  7. Brigid

    Brigid Active Member Anglican

    Posts:
    161
    Likes Received:
    99
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    AngloCatholic

    Exactly how the LCMS define evangelical. The focus, ceremony, decoration, etc is just like I've seen it in Anglican evangelical churches.
     
  8. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    2,711
    Likes Received:
    2,512
    Country:
    America
    Religion:
    Anglican
    Garden Gnome's description may have to do with his British context, where things are a lot more stark. The Anglo-Catholics are really out there. And the Evangelicals go completely the other way: I have typically seen them wear a suit, or even slacks for the Sunday Holy Communion. I've had one Evangelical Anglican (conservative, and not in good standing with the CofE liberals) tell me that the 39 Articles prove that by being a pastor he is also a bishop, who doesn't need to obey anyone (his justification for refusing the liberal bishops). He literally thought he was a bishop, wearing a turtleneck, and he thought the 39 articles supported him in that. Which proves nothing else than that he's an extremely embattled poor man, surrounded on all sides, and driven to extreme positions.

    In the United States things were just as dire during the 90s and 2000s. But after ACNA's formation it's gotten a lot better. I have never seen Anglican clergy wear a suit in any kind of divine service. But still, the traces of decades of bitter struggles (and defeats) inform the positions people take up.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2019
    Brigid likes this.
  9. Juliana

    Juliana Member Anglican

    Posts:
    68
    Likes Received:
    97
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Religion:
    Anglican - Anglo-Catholic
    I have had the same experience of evangelicalism. Many even go so far as to say that anyone in the Anglican church who is a real Christian should come out of it.
    But so far, from what I have observed within the Anglican church, I have (for now) come to the conclusion that evangelical means less reverent, and the service tends to be more focused on people, rather than God, whereas in more Anglo-Catholic services worship and reverence are central.
     
    Brigid and Rexlion like this.
  10. Rexlion

    Rexlion Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    3,667
    Likes Received:
    1,844
    Country:
    USA
    Religion:
    Christian attending ACNA
    I agree that Anglican services are more reverent than those of the congregational churches. I wouldn't want to see that change. What I would like to see in Anglican churches is a greater awareness and desire for soulwinning. I don't think there is any incompatibility between reverent worship, and obedience in carrying out the Great Commission. It is a great pity that evangelization is emphasized in some non-liturgical churches but not in liturgical churches, for the results of this can be plainly seen: the liturgical churches have a dearth of younger people but the evangelical churches are growing because they are going into the 'highways and byways' and bringing people in to hear the Gospel. I think we have a choice: we can either bemoan the problem of the dwindling numbers of parishioners, or we can become more obedient to the examples of Christ and the Apostles and actually be part of the solution.

    Act 13:46 Then Paul and Barnabas waxed bold, and said, It was necessary that the word of God should first have been spoken to you: but seeing ye put it from you, and judge yourselves unworthy of everlasting life, lo, we turn to the Gentiles.
    Act 13:47 For so hath the Lord commanded us, saying, I have set thee to be a light of the Gentiles, that thou shouldest be for salvation unto the ends of the earth.

    We know that we are to shine the light of the Gospel so that all those around us may see. This takes boldness. Christians should not be afraid of "what people will think of us" and keep the light of salvation hidden under cover. Too many of us today are "undercover Christians."

    Evangelism includes helping people be aware of God's love for them. And of course it also includes showing our love (and God's love working through us) toward others.
    Mat 5:14 Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid.
    Mat 5:15 Neither do men light a candle, and put it under a bushel, but on a candlestick; and it giveth light unto all that are in the house.
    Mat 5:16 Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven.

    Ideally, we should do our good works in a way that lets observers know that God's goodness is at the root of those deeds. For example, it's far more effective to donate to a Christian group that provides aid and relief coupled with the Gospel message, such as World Compassion, than to a secular group such as United Way.
     
    Anglo-cracker and Juliana like this.
  11. Tiffy

    Tiffy Well-Known Member

    Posts:
    2,817
    Likes Received:
    1,290
    Country:
    UK
    Religion:
    CofE
    By and large I agree with what you say here. We need though to draw a distinction between 'Evangelism' and Evangelicalism. I have a general distrust of 'isms'. I prefer to be thought of 'evangelistic' in the sense that Timothy was told to do the work of an evangelist. 2 Tim.4:5.

    A wise vicar I listened to when I was very much younger once said, after I had asked him which was best, the Evangelical approach or the Anglo-Catholic approach. He said, both have their good points, and bad. Evangelicals are very good at getting people to believe but Anglo-Catholics are much better at keeping them in the faith.

    The mistake that most Anglicans make is in adopting only the methods of one or the other, instead of being flexible enough to stretch to using the methods and traditions of both. The Holy Spirit requires 'F l e X i B l E' wineskins' not dyed in the wool, ridgid, rule bound traditionalists, slavishly using the same old tried, and supposedly proven formulas, for recruiting and inspiring 'seekers after the Kingdom'.

    Paul is recorded as saying he tried to be "All things to all people, so that God willing, some might be saved". Our churches need to have all the zeal of 'Evangelists' and all the reverence, fortitude and pastoral sensitivity of 'Universal' Anglicanism. That is 'catholic', with a small 'c'.

    Ritual is important but only if the reasons for it and the things it symbolises are understood. Evangelism is also important but only if the proselyte is brought into and nurtured by a believing and worshipping community which actually reflects the nature of Christ and operates according to the principles of His Kingdom.
    .
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2019
    Anglo-cracker, Magistos and Rexlion like this.
  12. JoeLaughon

    JoeLaughon Well-Known Member Anglican

    Posts:
    363
    Likes Received:
    320
    Country:
    United States
    Religion:
    ACNA
    It often gets tied up to issues of ritualism, "high" or "low." In reality it is simply an Anglicanism that emphasizes the Reformed and classically Protestant nature of Anglicanism. There are High and low Evangelicals.
     
    Geer likes this.