Why aren't there any traditional Anglican colleges?

Discussion in 'Questions?' started by Khater, Dec 14, 2015.

  1. Khater

    Khater Member

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    im a 16 year old Junior in high school. As a devout High Church Anglican, it saddens me to see that there is not a SINGLE good Anglican college. It seems like every denomination has a college, but not us.I wish I could attend a traditional Anglican college that provided a classical education. As no such college exists, I'm forced to look at classical Catholic and Evangelical colleges. Why couldn't the ACNA, the ACC or some other traditional Anglican group open up a classical Anglican college? I've never even heard the idea discussed. As of right now I have narrowed my college list to 3 schools.
    1. Patrick Henry College( very conservative classical Evangelical school. Very good for law and politics. From what I hear, there are a good number of Anglican students at the college) the website is phc.edu
    2. New St. Andrews College( classical Reformed college. They model their curriculum after 17th century Harvard) the website is nsa.edu
    3. Thomas Aquinas College- classical, Great Books Catholic college. All classes are discussion based and use the Socratic method. Like the other 2, they read only the Great Books and use only primary source works. No lectures and no textbooks. The website is thomasaquinas.edu

    These are all good schools, but I really wish there was an Anglican college like this.
     
  2. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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    I don't know the answer to your question, but Patrick Henry is a good school. I know several good anglicans from there. Message me if you want to get in touch with some of them.
     
  3. Mark

    Mark Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Khater,

    Oxford, use to be a good Christian (Anglican School). Georgetown was a good Roman Catholic School. Here in the deep south, Spring Hill College was a great school on the Jesuit model. Harvard and the Ivy league schools in the States all started as Christian schools. Sadly they have all fallen to the
    secular gods.

    Why are there not any good Anglican or very few true Christian Colleges? No real demand. Christian parents send their kids to school that the secular world tells us will be the best for our kids. Give them all the world can offer. Their spiritual life is second or maybe never considered.

    Which ever Christian School you are thinking of attending, check it out closely. My Bishop approved Spring Hill College. Run by the Roman Catholic Church. Orthodox, at least the information on line and in writing told me. I spent my two years there on my Masters of Theology defending the Church, Scripture, History from the "catholic" teachers. Had female Lutheran "priests" teaching me Christology using the Jesus Seminar. And no they were not using them as an example of apostates, but of the truth. I was an Anglican Deacon and Priest arguing with Roman, Lutherans, PCUSA clergy and teachers on what scripture means, what the Church teaches, refuting lies about the Roman Church and Christianity in general. Got my lowest GPA from Spring Hill. Even though I argued with my teachers at the Reformed Theological Seminary, they were more level headed and fair. Did not agree, but were not petty.

    So make sure the school you choose is what you think it is. I have a young man I am mentoring at Ave Maria in south Florida. Suppose to be very orthodox and Roman Catholic. Only through much prayer has he maintained the faith.

    Discern wisely.

    Fr. Mark
     
  4. Lowly Layman

    Lowly Layman Well-Known Member Anglican

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    The reformed episcopal church has several seminaries which I have heard great things about. The REC is a affiliated with the ACNA and I am told is the most solidly traditional of all the traditional anglican affiliates. Here is the website: http://www.rechurch.org/

    There is a tab for seminaries on the launch page.
     
  5. Khater

    Khater Member

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    Lowly Layman
    I want to be either a lawyer or a banker. Would this be possible from a seminary?
     
  6. Lowly Layman

    Lowly Layman Well-Known Member Anglican

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    No. Not for lawyers, at least. My apologies for misunderstanding your question.
     
  7. Khater

    Khater Member

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    Lowly Layman
    Could you take a look at the 3 colleges I'm looking at, and let me know what you think of them?
    1. Patrick Henry College ( phc.edu
    2. New St. Andrews College (nsa.edu)
    3. Thomas Aquinas College (thomasaquinas.edu)
     
  8. fatherfoos

    fatherfoos New Member

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    Khater,

    It sounds like you have an interesting life and perspective. I can't offer you a college--it's a problem that a number of us are at least talking about--I can offer you a gap year program. St. Andrew's Church & Academy run the Lindisfarne House program--a one to two year gap year program; become a monk for a year; learn, study, pray, serve...

    From the still not-quite ready website:

    What is this Lindisfarne House?
    St. Andrew’s Academy’s Lindisfarne House is a gap year program in which the participants take temporary monastic vows.

    What are the vows?
    The participant takes vows of chastity, poverty, stability of place, and obedience.

    Why would one do such a thing?
    There are many reasons! The opportunity to serve Christ and His Church in the context of daily prayer, work, and a close church community is a major incentive. Living in one of the most beautiful places in American isn’t so bad either.

    [​IMG]
    This is one of the many beautiful views found around Lake Almanor.

    What does a Lindisfarne participant do?

    One does whatever is needed by the Church and Academy with consideration to the participant’s strengths and weaknesses. Many of the regular jobs include: office management, education (teachers as well as aides), computer graphics and design of print and web media, video production, outdoor recreation, public relations, publishing, child-care, and sewing.

    This sounds like a great opportunity for spiritual growth. Where can I get more information?

    Email the Priest in Charge at: bfoos@standrewsalmanor.org.
     
  9. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

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    Beautiful location fatherfoos. Cn you tell me more abut the church and academy and this program they are sponsoring? I've harbored interest in retreats of some kind myself.
     
  10. fatherfoos

    fatherfoos New Member

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    And that picture didn't even include the lake!

    We are very fortunate to live here. The Academy was founded in 1999, and St. Andrew's Church is a mission, only four years old. It's an interesting story, and a little backward, but hopefully, this is all God's idea!

    See our website for full info. on both—standrewsalmanor.org
     
  11. fatherfoos

    fatherfoos New Member

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    Oh...and by the way, Khatur, for what it's worth, here's my 2 cents on the colleges you're looking at:

    1. Patrick Henry College ( phc.edu
    Friendly to Anglicans, very homeschooled group, strong in political science, etc. Know at least on Anglican professor there.

    2. New St. Andrews College (nsa.edu)
    In my experience, not friendly to Anglicans. They've had them there in the past, but they've moved decidedly away from a friendly posture. Don't know any Anglican prof's there. Peter Leithart was as close as one could come--and he left.

    3. Thomas Aquinas College (thomasaquinas.edu)
    Very seriously Roman. Good school from all I hear--haven't connected with anyone there lately. Also used to have a fairly large homeschool attendance. If you want an Anglican parish nearby, I'm not sure that's very easy for Thomas Aquinas.

    Suggestions: Look at University of Dallas (lots of Anglicans nearby) and Grove City College (growing Anglican Church, though not high, in town).
     
  12. Stalwart

    Stalwart Well-Known Member Anglican

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