Is Infant Baptism a required belief/practice?

Discussion in 'Sacraments and Holy Orders' started by BibleHoarder, Nov 28, 2017.

  1. JoeLaughon

    JoeLaughon Active Member Anglican

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  2. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    The Depositary of Faith consists of both scripture and tradition. Baptism is a sacrament administered in infancy so that everyone can avail of its God given grace at the earliest opportunity
     
  3. BibleHoarder

    BibleHoarder Active Member

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    I never left Anglicanism because I was never Anglican to begin with, but I do sympathize for Anglicans who I believe are indeed fellow brothers and sisters in the Lord. Mind you, I can agree with the majority of Anglican doctrine as outlined in the BCP and its Articles, it's just that I have my share of doubts as well.
     
  4. Khater

    Khater Member

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    It ought to be. It was more or less unanimously believed in the Early Church
     
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  5. Tiffy

    Tiffy Active Member Anglican

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    And this, ironically, is implied by the fact that it is not mentioned specifically in the New Testament. On the day of Pentecost 3000 were baptized. Probably many of those 'souls', were children and infants. It is extremely unlikely that any Jewish parent would accept baptism knowing their infants and children to be excluded from the promises attending this new right and new covenant, (as Baptists appear to believe). Those promises are made clear in Peter's speech. Acts.2:37-41.

    It is also implied tacitly, in the total lack of any Apostolic prohibition against it, anywhere in any place, in the whole of the New Testament.

    For sure most baptisms we have record of in the NT are of adults, but that is not surprising. Most of those, household or individual, recorded baptisms, are also of Gentiles who entered the church as adult proselytes and therefore needed to hear the gospel, understand and confess the faith. Later in the life of the church, those same baptized Gentile believers would have expected the same covenant relationship with them and their offspring, offered to believing Jews, who God had promised under the terms sworn to Abraham, that their children would be entitled to the same promise of salvation and all the benefits of the covenant, until such time as they took responsibility for their own 'walk with God'.

    There is also the fact that there is not a single recorded instance, in NT scripture, of the adult children of a believer being baptized.

    But the doctrine of infant baptism is not resting on NT evidence, though the NT supports it in the ways I have mentioned, plus one or two others. The doctrine is based upon an overview of Old and New Testament Biblical Covenant Theology, and a profound belief that God is entirely responsible for the salvation of mankind, both corporately and individually. Our salvation is entirely of God. Whatever age we might think we get it. 2 Cor.5:18.
     
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