Bibles

Discussion in 'Sacred Scripture' started by Anthony B, Mar 19, 2018.

  1. Anthony B

    Anthony B New Member

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    I don't know if this has already been asked, but I am looking for a Bible that has the full Anglican canon. My primary version is the ESV, but it is not published with the Apocrypha. Anyone have any links to some?
     
  2. JayEhm

    JayEhm Member

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    Good question. I read the AV and the Orthodox Study Bible for the missing books.

    https://anglican-parishes-association.myshopify.com/products/1928-bcp-kjv-bible
     
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  3. PotterMcKinney

    PotterMcKinney Active Member Typist Anglican

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    Usually, the NRSV will have all the books. That is the most available version out there. The RSV will do so as well, and I believe there was at one point an ESV edition done with it, but it is hard to find. It is fairly inexpensive to purchase a small copy of the King James translation of the apocrypha online for about $7, as well.
     
  4. Cameron

    Cameron Active Member

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    If you get a Douai-Rheims version, you'll have all the books in a lovely translation not unlike the KJV. KJV's with the deuterocanon aren't difficult to find, either, however if you want one that is good quality you might be off for a frustrating search. I think there was one published for the KJV's 500th anniversary? I could be wrong.

    The Orthodox Study Bible is a WONDERFUL publication. I mean really good. Our rector uses it for his bible study. I've only been able to purchase the New Testament and I love it. It uses the NKJV, another good translation.
     
  5. BibleHoarder

    BibleHoarder Active Member

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    Wrong, see here: https://www.amazon.com/English-Standard-Version-Bible-Apocrypha/dp/0195289102
    They're even cheaper on eBay. I got a copy of this same version new for only $20.

    Also, for the KJV Apocrypha: https://www.amazon.com/Apocrypha-King-James-Version/dp/0521506743

    I collect bibles, preferably full-sized hardcovers with the deuterocanon for my shelf of different translations. I have copies of the RSV, NRSV, ESV, Good News, and others with the apocrypha as mentioned. Although I am a Protestant, I do reference the Douay-Rheims from time to time because it is a faithful translation of the Latin Vulgate, which is often a point of criticism (not being based on the original greek or hebrew). That, however, is what makes it interesting, as you can see the differences in the Latin version without actually having to know latin. It is a literal, faithful word-for-word rendering of the Vulgate into English. I also get pocket versions of my favorite translations for reading on the go. Lately, I've started to appreciate the NKJV for having the qualities of accuracy, tradition (for cultural familiarity, since the KJV is a standard) and ease of reading, which means it succeeds in multiple categories. Although there is some contention about certain passages being in the most ancient witnesses (as was the case with KJV), most modern versions come with notes to mark out the parts in question to clarify these matters. I don't like the fact that the NRSV deviates from traditional passages such as "They pierced my hands and feet" with the extremely non-standard "My hands and feet are withered", or changes in familiar scriptures like Psalm 23, among others. The original is actually more faithful but is largely out of print, except for the Catholic Edition which revises passages to suit Roman Catholic doctrine.
     
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  6. Shane R

    Shane R Active Member

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    The ESV apocrypha is only a re-print of the RSV's original work. The Orthodox Study Bible is NKJV for the NT, but the OT is a proprietary translation from the Septuagint. As such, it is unique and valuable to the academic but not easily followed by anyone using a Bible from the Masoretic tradition. The Knox Bible is very good, but there is a single publisher and it is pricey. Knox was a Roman Catholic with an ear for English poetry. His version is probably the most lyrical ever produced exclusively by a Catholic in the English language. The Douai is stiff and the NAB family is dumbed down and rather ugly in the poetic books and passages.
     
  7. BibleHoarder

    BibleHoarder Active Member

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    The Knox Bible could easily rival the KJV in its beauty. One valid criticism against it however, is that Knox may have gone off the deep end at times in flaunting his brilliance, so that some passages come off as more wordy or dynamic than is necessary (which is why the KJV still wins in accuracy). The NAB has been slammed by Catholics (both laymen and priests) for adding nothing new to the table in terms of translation, and it's horrid footnotes mocking biblical inerrancy. Most predominantly Roman Catholic bibles tend to be lacking, but my hardcover copy of Knox is one of my prized possessions.
     
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  8. BibleHoarder

    BibleHoarder Active Member

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    I don't know if this matters, but yesterday I was studying Psalm 45 because it's quoted in hebrews, and many Orthodox Jews claim it was only about David or a man-king. The messianic context became clearer over time as I read it, and I consulted a few commentaries from Messianic Jewish apologists. However, one particular line that confused me was:
    "...and thy right hand shall teach thee terrible things." (KJV)

    I guess you could say Jesus acquired knowledge on earth in his ministry as both man and God, but I was still unsure what to make of it.

    Even the NRSV says:
    "...let your right hand teach you dread deeds."

    Holman Christian Standard made it a bit clearer:
    "...May your right hand show your awe-inspiring acts."

    That makes sense, but the 'teach' rendering is the most literal, so how did they arrive at that interpretation?

    But, I consulted Douay because I knew it was based on the ancient Vulgate, and found it's rendering to be the most concise as to what it may mean:
    "...and thy right hand shall conduct thee wonderfully."
     
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