Anne Boleyn - Bible

Discussion in 'Anglican History' started by Philip Barrington, Aug 21, 2017.

  1. Philip Barrington

    Philip Barrington Well-Known Member

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    I am doing a bit of historical reading of the Tudor Period at the moment, and something I found interesting was the realisation that the commissioning of the Great Bible and the impetus for its distribution was most likely at the encouragement and behest of Anne Boleyn.

    Somehow I had always allowed Henry VIII all the credit, however it seems on deeper reading that there was good cause. Whilst Anne Boleyn is often thought of as a Lutheran, that is almost certainly not the case, though she was interested and impressed by much of the work of the reformers.

    Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn, and others believed that the Bible clearly made a case for the authority of the King - the anointed sovereign - rather than the Pope who was in part seen as a political vassal of the European Temporal Lords, and to that extent a foreign power. This of course had a great deal to do with the King's Great Matter.

    In his heart Henry VIII, seems to have been essentially a Catholic King, who had a problematic Pope. The Tudor obsession with succession gave him some of a blinkered vision. England could not afford another War of the Roses, and Henry saw that as his duty. He did come to the view that the Pope should be constrained by Scripture. I think it is clear that Anne Boleyn was in part responsible for helping him come to that conclusion, both by virtue of her own opinions, and by virtue of the things and people she encouraged him to read and come in contact with. Cranmer, undoubtedly being one of them.
     
  2. anglican74

    anglican74 Well-Known Member Anglican

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    I mean basically yes, Henry was a Roman Catholic through and through (that is to say, an un-reformed Catholic). It was Anne Boleyn who was behind a lot of the reforms, and after she was unjustly executed by the king, it was Catherine Parr:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine_Parr
     
  3. Aidan

    Aidan Well-Known Member

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    Correct me if I'm wrong, I seem to remember reading somewhere old Hery forbade Protestant reformers from coming to England
     
  4. Philip Barrington

    Philip Barrington Well-Known Member

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    Henry VIII certainly did for the most part adhere to some catholic principles. The purposes of Henry VIII's legislation was to affirm what he saw as the Kings sacramental role as the anointed (by God) ruler of the Kingdom. Wolsey exerted great influence for the early part of Henry's reign, and Wolsey was a man torn between his loyalty to the Pope and his loyalty to the King. I do not think that Henry VIII say that he was changing anything, save for the governance of the Church. Walsey banned a goodly number of publications coming from the new religion of the continent. Anne Boleyn in her time is Austria, and then in the French Court had encountered much of this and did believe that there was a level of corruption in the Church/Rome.

    At one stage I think there was a visit from some lights of the continental reformation, and Henry was displeased and I think that he recalled parliament and that was around the passing of the six articles. Henry was no fan of much of the reformation, however I thinks views in his life depended in part on who he was listening to at the time, Wolsey, Aragan, Comwell, Boleyn, Cranmer.

    He was keen (in the Boleyn period) to encourage the Bible in English, but some years later not so keen as he felt that spiritual topics had become the talk of ignorant persons in taverns. Like Anglicanism, it is difficult to put Henry VIII in a box.
     

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